gender

Motherhood penalty remains a pervasive problem in the workplace

December 1, 2009 posted by Ruth Schechter

Originally posted November 22, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Mothers looking for employment are less likely to be hired, are offered lower salaries and are perceived as being less committed to a job than fathers or women without children, according to a recent study of gender inequality in the workplace. What’s more, the pay gap between mothers and childless women is actually bigger than the pay gap between women and men.


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STEM Education Must Include Women, Says President Obama

November 30, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

This morning, I ran across a White House press release on a new STEM initiative the Obama administration is launching. According to the release, women and STEM are part of Obama’s three priorities for STEM education:


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FAST FACT: GENDER EQUITY IN ATHLETICS DURING DIFFICULT ECONOMIC TIMES

November 16, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

As the economy dips, schools are tightening their belts. Unfortunately—but not surprisingly—a new fact sheet released by the National Women’s Law Center reveals that girls are bearing the brunt of budget cuts. According to the fact sheet,


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The Democrats’ Dilemma: Their Own Trojan Horse Kicks Free

Posted November 13, 2009 by admin

Originally posted By Gloria Feldt* on November 12, 2009 as a WMC Exclusive

Democratic leaders have said that the turn-around on abortion contained in the House health-reform bill will not appear in the final version. The author, a Women’s Media Center board member and former president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, explains here why voters who value women’s health cannot sit back and accept such assurances.


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The House Affordable Health Care Act Passes At a Steep Price for Women’s Reproductive Health

November 12, 2009 posted by admin

Last Saturday, the House passed the historic Affordable Health Care Act (HR 3962), but it came at a steep price for women's reproductive rights, as the Stupak-Pitts Amendment was tacked on -- greatly restricting health insurance options for women.


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Women and Public Space

November 11, 2009 posted by Cheryl Huber*

Last month, NCRW staffer Kyla Bender-Baird spoke on a panel hosted by NYU Wagner Women's Caucus along with Cheryl Huber of New Yorkers for Parks and The International Women's Health Coalition's Khushbu Srivastava.  The panel discussed "The Impact of Women in Public Service."  Cheryl's comments on the intersections of gender and urban planning brought up an often over-looked perspective. 


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Achieving Political Equality by Living It

By Tonni Brodber*

Linda Basch: From your perspective, what is the unfinished work of women’s political equality?

Tonni Brodber: In the English-speaking Caribbean women’s participation in political leadership ranges from a high of 13% in Jamaica to a low of 0% in Belize, with many countries like St. Kitts and Nevis and St Lucia hovering at 6.7% and at 5.6% respectively. In the face of such paltry numbers, it almost pains me to say that it is my belief that the unfuinished work of women’s political equality is the lack of quality and diversity.


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Change was promised, Change has come

May 27, 2009 posted by Linda Basch After nearly a month of anticipation, President Obama has finally announced his nomination for Supreme Court justice—and what a nomination!  The President tapped Sonia Sotomayor, a New York federal appeals justice born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in housing projects in the South Bronx.     In a world where most Latinas are far less likely to go on to college than any other group of women, only 2.9 % of Latina Women hold advanced graduate degrees, 10% of all Latina women are unemployed, and the number of female Hispanic Federal Court Judges can be counted on one hand, Sotomayor has risen above those odds to become the first ever Hispanic woman to be nominated to the Supreme Court. Her ascent from humble beginnings mirrors President Obama’s personal narrative; both overcame incredible obstacles to become role models for generations.  For those in the Hispanic Community, her appointment is a glimmer of hope that the often silenced voice of the Hispanic, female minority has a better chance of being represented in public debates and decision-making.


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Tradeswomen Organizing for Change: 30 Years and Counting

May 25, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

As the granddaughter of a woman engineer (and also someone who struggles to assemble her Ikea furniture but loves her new toolkit anyway), it was an honor to be surrounded by tradeswomen at the Institute for Women and Work’s panel last Thursday night up at Cornell.  We were gathered to discuss how the economic crisis and recovery efforts in New York impact women, particularly tradeswomen.  For me, though, it was an education in a history I didn’t even know existed: the history of tradeswomen in the U.S. and their fight for recognition and rights.  After 30 years of activism, women still only comprise 3% of the construction labor force.   As one panelist said, “do we really believe that men have 97% of the answers?”  I think not. Although frustration with this slow-moving progress was evident in the room, the Cornell event was more celebratory than anything else. Susan Eisenberg shared slides from her multi-media installation, On Equal Terms.   The theme of the installation: Women in construction—30 years and still organizing.  The most provocative exhibit was the bathroom shack, literally a 6 foot by 6 foot plywood replica of a typical bathroom tradeswoman encounter on the job, complete with documented misogynistic and explicitly sexual graffiti. 


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