Legal Instruments

Anti-Union Efforts and Wisconsin's Women Workers

By Kate Meyer*


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CEDAW FORUM: Lighting a Fire for the Women’s Rights Treaty

By Allie Bohm*

As a colleague recently reminded me, our system of government was developed not to pass laws, but to make change slowly. Take, for example, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the international treaty dedicated to gender equality. Although the U.S. played a major role in drafting the treaty and signed it in 1980, it still has not been ratified by the Senate. We’re hoping to change that this year.


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The legal system as a tool to protect women’s rights

by Ruth Schechter
Originally posted May 16, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Globally, women face a unique range of human rights issues, from female circumcision to sex slavery, domestic violence, infanticide, and honor killings.


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The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC)

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org

Balancing the Equation: Where are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering, and Technology?

Balancing the Equation identifies the gains made in science, engineering and technology, the key challenges that remain, the lessons learned, and new issues that must be addressed. A Resource Guide in the report provides the reader with material to pursue further research about successful programs, many of which were established by NCRW, now Re:Gender network members. Also included are Recommendations, which emphasize that an increase in women and girls' participation in all levels of science, engineering and technology requires strong leadership, changes in cultural values and practices, and systemic reform.

Teaser: 

Balancing the Equation identifies the gains made in science, engineering and technology, the key challenges that remain, the lessons learned, and new issues that must be addressed. A Resource Guide in the report provides the reader with material to pursue further research about successful programs, many of which were established by Re:Gender network members.

 

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