Glass Ceilings & Barriers

The Celluloid Ceiling: Behind-the-Scenes Employment of Women in the Top 250 Films of 2011

 In 2011, women comprised 18% of all directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working on the top 250 domestic grossing films. This represents an increase of 2 percentage points from 2010 and an increase of 1 percentage point from 1998.

Women accounted for 5% of directors, a decrease of 2 percentage points from 2010 and approximately half the percentage of women directors working in 1998.

38% of films employed 0 or 1 woman in the roles considered, 23% employed 2 women, 30% employed 3 to 5 women, and 7% employed 6 to 9 women.

URL: 
http://womenintvfilm.sdsu.edu/files/2011_Celluloid_Ceiling_Exec_Summ.pdf

The Female Vision: Women's Real Power at Work

At an NCRW expert panel on September 29, 2010 at American Express, authors Sally Helgesen and Julie Johnson provided compelling evidence for the view that companies with both women and men in strategic leadership positions have a competitive advantage over companies that do not. The particular strengths of women - their broad-spectrum vision, empathy
and interpersonal skills, and their value-based, collaborative style - are increasingly recognized, but still under-valued in assessing leadership potential.

Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership

NCRW held an expert panel on February 28, 2011 at American Express with senior leaders from business, government, and academia to explore the case for, barriers to, and action steps needed to expand the number of women in leadership positions. While many overt barriers to women’s advancement have been largely dismantled, and the pipeline to leadership is filled with highly qualified women, the embedded prejudices in our institutions and culture as well as the expectations women have for their professional and personal lives, especially younger women, still pose challenges.

Men Rule: The Continued Under-Representation of Women in U.S. Politics

 New report from American University's Women & Politics Institute, "Men Rule: The Continued Under-Representation of Women in U.S. Politics," details the results of a survey of nearly 4,000 leaders, all of whom are well-situated to run for office and why even with the emergence over the past ten years of high-profile women in politics, the authors find that the gap between women and men's interest in running for office is the same today as it was a decade ago.

(From the Press Release)

URL: 
http://www.american.edu/spa/wpi/upload/2012-Men-Rule-Report-web.pdf
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