Leadership in Civil Society

CEDAW Forum: Time to Make History With CEDAW

By Don Kraus*

The bumper sticker on my wife’s car reads, “Well-behaved women seldom make history!” I believe proponents of CEDAW, the Women’s Treaty, have been minding their manners a bit too much. CEDAW is the most important international mechanism for women’s equality, and provides a universal standard for women’s human rights. The treaty is a basic framework for ending violence against women, ensuring girls access to education, and promoting economic opportunity and political participation for women.


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Can You Hear (or Read) Me Now?

Originally posted by Rylee Sommers-Flagan June 24, 2010 on EmoryWheel,com (Emory University's student newspaper)

I’ve long been suspicious that editorialists and editorial boards, despite purporting to speak on behalf of their audiences, are not demographically representative of the larger population. These suspicions were confirmed for me last week in a workshop with a group called the OpEd Project.

According to several studies, men dominate something called “thought leadership” in the United States. Specifically, male voices make up about 85 percent of those present in the national editorial conversation. They supply the perspective in opinion media, vastly outnumbering female representation in talk shows, expert interviews, and op-ed pieces across our country.


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From the Women's Media Center: The Ground We Stand On

Earlier this month, the Women's Media Center featured an excellent "exclusive" written by Kenyan feminist and scholar Achola O. Pala.  Presenting a perspective too often unheard within women's activist communities, Pala argues that feminists from formerly colonized countries should look to their own cultural heritage for guideposts in creating greater justice in their communities.  Here are two gems to whet your appetite:


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The way we do our work matters

Originally posted by Ruth Schechter on June 14, 2010 on Gender News, from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

While the power of activism is crucial to “make injustice visible,” for Anne Firth Murray, it’s the small steps and personal actions that will bring about social change.


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Girls Inc Scholars Take It to the White House

By Kyla Bender-Baird

I have to admit, when I was a kid, I was convinced that I would be the first woman President of the United States.  Eventually, I abandoned that career goal but to this day am still a bit of a politics nerd.  Well, it's nice to see that the next generation of girl leaders are getting a jumpstart on civic engagement thanks to Girls IncEarlier this month, four Girls Inc National Scholars met with the First Lady's staff to discuss barriers to physical activities for girls across the U.S. Click here to view videos of the girls talking about this amazing experience.


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Microphones for Justice: Mother’s Day Delegation Tackles Anti-Immigration Legislation

By Sarah Gold*

A Mother’s Day Delegation of feminists and labor activists from around the country convened in Arizona a few weeks ago to document the impact of the recently-passed SB 1070 legislation and existing policies, such as 287(g) on women and children. In a climate already steeped with anti-immigrant sentiment, these pieces of legislation authorize violence against women and children, ruthlessly separating family members and criminalizing mothers who came to the United States simply to support their children.


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