Leadership in Civil Society

Member Center Awards 2012

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03/06/2012
MEMBER CENTER AWARDS 2012
 
NCRW Announces 2012 Lifetime Achievement and Diversity Awards: MEDIA ALERT

(February 17, 2012) --The National Council for Research on Women is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2012 Member Center Awards:
 
* The Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women at Brown University will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award, and
* The Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership at St. Mary’s College in Notre Dame, IN, will receive the Diversity and Inclusion Award.

AMEX Emerging Leaders Program Launch press release

The National Council for Research on Women with support from the American Express Foundation will host a one-year (2010-2011) program to support emerging leaders in the non-profit sector. The 35 fellows will receive mentorship and training in areas such as human resources management, securing organizational resources, and ‘leading from the middle’ (as opposed to top-down strategies). Entitled Building the Next Generation of Leadership in the Nonprofit Sector, the program will train 35 entry- to mid-level managers who were selected out of a pool of more than 250 applicants.  Representing a variety of backgrounds, the 35 selected fellows come from a wide range of organizations including 13 NCRW Member Centers, and 10 different states.

NCRW President Linda Basch Received WNBA Inspiring Women Award July 27, 2010

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07/27/2010

NCRW President Linda Basch received WNBA Inspiring Women Award

CEDAW FORUM: Lighting a Fire for the Women’s Rights Treaty

By Allie Bohm*

As a colleague recently reminded me, our system of government was developed not to pass laws, but to make change slowly. Take, for example, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the international treaty dedicated to gender equality. Although the U.S. played a major role in drafting the treaty and signed it in 1980, it still has not been ratified by the Senate. We’re hoping to change that this year.


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CEDAW FORUM: There’s No Time Like the Present

The United States remains one of only seven countries that have not ratified CEDAW (the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women).  CEDAW is an international agreement on basic human rights for women and the most broadly endorsed human rights treaty within the United Nations, having been ratified by over 90% of UN member states. CEDAW outlines human rights such as the right to live free from violence, the ability to go to school, and access to the political system.


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CEDAW FORUM: The U.S. Needs a Human Rights Treaty for Women Domestically

By Margot Baruch* 

Before CEDAW there was no international legal mechanism in place that called on states to assess gender inequalities in their country. The Convention draws attention to 30 articles that deal with discrimination on the basis of being a woman. The treaty is divided into six parts - all related to ensuring that women are able to enjoy their “fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,” as stated in the preamble of the UDHR [Universal Declaration of Human Rights].  


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CEDAW FORUM: The Unfinished Business of Ratification

By Linda Tarr-Whelan*

NCRW asked leading research and policy expert Linda Tarr-Whelan to weigh in on the status of CEDAW. In addition to her responses, below is an excerpt from a previously published commentary from Linda featured on Women’s eNEws and The Huffington Post.

On Dec. 18, 1979, the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, or CEDAW, making it a watershed day for women around the globe.

In those heady days, I was deputy assistant to President Jimmy Carter for women's concerns. We expected speedy action after he sent the treaty to the Senate.


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