Immigration & Migration

Worldwide, there are more than 190 million migrants living outside their countries of origin, nearly half of them women. Women may migrate out of choice but they are usually driven by necessity: poverty, conflict, domestic violence, natural disaster or oppressive political or cultural conditions. In North America, immigrant women have outnumbered immigrant men since 1930, yet their progress in education, income and status has lagged and policymakers have often overlooked their unique challenges and contributions. For instance, although they occupy lower-wage jobs, immigrant women send a much higher proportion of their earnings to their home countries than do immigrant men. Compared to non-immigrant women, immigrant women face higher rates of unemployment and are much more likely to live in poverty and suffer abuse or discrimination.

NEW YEAR'S FORUM: A Conversation with Kavita

January 6, 2009 posted by  Linda Basch As we start off with our New Year’s Resolutions for the nation, I begin with an inspiring conversation I recently had with Kavita Ramdas, President and CEO of the Global Fund for Women. We were musing about the future, particularly with regard to women’s human rights at this optimistic moment for the country, with a new administration about to take charge in Washington. But as Kavita pointed out, as we begin to look forward, we also need to be self reflective as a nation. We need to develop a sense of collective responsibility. A number of problems have grown up over the past several years that we can’t sweep away, that we must address as a country and hold ourselves accountable for. I couldn’t agree more. I love conversations that are as wide-ranging as this one was.  We covered a lot of ground.  Some highlights:  As someone who works on global women's rights, Kavita hopes that the new administration will place a high priority on advancing women's rights worldwide. This can only be achieved by the US decreasing its emphasis on militarism and violence as the primary means to resolve conflict and re-focusing its efforts away from the so called "war on terror" towards efforts to eradicate global poverty, inequality, and injustice. Yet, she insisted, that much of the US's ability to achieve such results globally will depend on the choices it makes inside its own borders. So, I asked Kavita what she would like to see in terms of change right here at home….

<< Back to the Full Blog

Feminist Town Hall November 5, 2008 Live @ 7 PM ET

November 5, 2008 posted by Vivienne Heston-Demirel Apologies for audio problems. It is 7:30 and we are going LIVE.


Michelle Goldberg - journalist/author, specialized in ideology and politics - said she was optimistic but that there were a few dark clouds, namely, anti-gay ballot initiatives that passed in California, Florida, Arizona (anti-gay marriage), and Arkansas (anti-gay adoption). All of the anti-choice initiatives failed. There is a potential for extreme right-wing terrorism, including attacks on abortion providers.


Andrea Batista Schlesinger - Executive Director, Drum Major Institute for Public Policy - just concluded her opening statements.


<< Back to the Full Blog

Latinas’ “Cafecito” with the Presidential Candidates

October 24, 2008 posted by Silvia Henriquez, Executive Director, National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health 


If Latinas had a “cafecito”* with each presidential candidate, what questions would we ask?


<< Back to the Full Blog

Syndicate content