Awareness & Education

THE GIRLS REPORT: What We Know & Need to Know About Growing Up Female

"Seven years ago the National Council for Research on Women and its member centers issued major reports on the status of girls in society, in schools, and in youth organizations in the United States. Since then, university researchers and popular writers have focussed attention on girls. The Girls Report is a fresh and timely look at every aspect of life for girls as we look toward the new millenium.

"If the reports in the early 1990s struck a chord of concern and a call to action, the tone of this report is optimism and activism. As we say at Girls Incorporated, girls are strong, smart and bold unless society puts barriers in their way. Lynn Phillips and the National Council staff have captured the strength, the energy, and the possibilities of girls on their way to becoming young women, while calling on the rest of us to be vigilant in supporting girls' high hopes and expectations for their own achievement."

Teaser: 

The Girls Report surveys current studies on girls, mapping theoretical debates, countering popular myths with recent research findings, and highlighting successful programs serving diverse populations. Chapters on education, health, self-esteem, violence, sexuality, and economic realities conclude with clear recommendations for action. A comprehensive bibliography offers resources to educators, researchers, policymakers, and all concerned with increasing opportunities for girls.

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New Strategies for Leadership

May 11, 2009 posted by admin

One of the many dynamic panels to be featured at our upcoming annual conference , Igniting Change: Activating Alliances for Social Justice, will feature top scholars and activists taking apart the challenges of building pipelines of leadership for young girls and boys.  At the end of the session, we hope to offer new strategies for collaborating with youth as we discover new definitions of leadership and feminism. 


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Gains and Gaps: A Look at the World's Women

GAINS AND GAPS: A LOOK AT THE WORLD'S WOMEN

(March 2006) Over the past decade, United Nations agencies have tracked women’s progress in critical areas identified by the 1995 United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing . In 2000, the Re:Gender, formerly National Council for Research on Women, produced a report which, through statistics, mirrored these areas and provided a snapshot of the current status of women in the world. In Spring 2006, the organization released a report that presents another snapshot, five years later – Gains and Gaps: A Look at the World's Women.

We express profound gratitude to the institutions that provided funding for this report.

We especially thank the Lead Sponsor, UBS, for its encouragement and generous financial support from the early stages of the project through its completion.

Teaser: 

Over the past decade, United Nations agencies have tracked women’s progress in critical areas identified by the 1995 United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing . In 2000, Re:Gender, formerly National Council for Research on Women, produced a report which, through statistics, mirrored these areas and provided a snapshot of the current status of women in the world. In Spring 2006, we released a report that presents another snapshot, five years later – Gains and Gaps: A Look at the World's Women.

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ADVOCACY CORNER: White House Council on Women and Girls

March 11, 2009 posted by admin Take the Women in Politics History QuizThis just in: by executive order President Obama has created a White House Council on Women and Girls.  As NOW stated in their press release, "We asked for a Cabinet-level office to work on women's issues, and we got the entire cabinet." The Council will headed by Valerie Jarrett and include every Cabinet secretary and head of every Cabinet-level agency.  This is obviously a huge step.  What do you think the first


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DIVERSITY WRIT LARGE: Telling the Full Story of a Capitol Built by Those Who Were Enslaved

January 28, 2009 posted by Delores M. Walters Last week we all watched as the First Family moved into a mansion built partially by enslaved people. The inauguration of the country’s first Black president has prompted historians to fill in the void in public knowledge about the contributions of African Americans to the making of American society more generally.


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