Disparities

WOMEN GO GLOBAL CD-ROM

The United Nations and the International Women's Movement 1945-2000

To mark Beijing +5, the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women have produced Women Go Global, showing how the international women's movement and the United Nations have worked side-by-side in the quest for gender equality. The multimedia presentation features milestones in the establishment of the international agenda for equality between women and men, from the creation of the United Nations in 1945 and Beijing +5 in June 2000. Kristen Timothy, Visiting Scholar at the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, undertook the substantive research that provides the basis for the program.

To order a copy of Women Go Global, click here.

 

 

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The United Nations and the International Women's Movement 1945-2000 To mark Beijing +5, the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women will produce a CD-Rom showing how the international women's movement and the United Nations have worked side-by-side in the quest for gender equality. Milestones in the establishment of the international agenda for equality between women and men from the creation of the United Nations in 1945 and Beijing +5 in June 2000 are featured in the multi-media presentation.

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MISSING Information About Women's Lives

National researchers, policymakers, and the media have voiced major concerns in recent weeks about a pattern of distorting knowledge-based information and science in the service of political goals under the current administration. Now, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, brings you the story from the women's research and policy perspective.

The Report
MISSING: Information About Women's Lives is a 24-page report that documents how crucial data on women and girls is disappearing. Download the report in PDF format (PDF, 408 KB) or order a copy.

Executive Summary
To download the executive summary in PDF format, click here (PDF, 172 KB).

Press Release

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Over the past few years, vital data has been deleted, buried, distorted, or has otherwise gone missing from government websites and publications. The National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender has documented in this report, the deletion and omission of such information and outlined how these actions directly affect women's lives.

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Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass — and Why it Matters

For more than a quarter century, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, the Council brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

Our report, Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass – and Why it Matters, explores the under-representation of women in the field, draws on research suggesting the benefits women can bring, and lays out concrete action steps for change. Specifically, we call on the financial services industry to develop a “critical mass principle” with quantifiable benchmarks and guidelines for increasing the number of women at all leadership levels.

Teaser: 

For more than a quarter century, Re:Gender (formerly National Council for Research on Women) has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, Re:Gender brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

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Tradeswomen Organizing for Change: 30 Years and Counting

May 25, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

As the granddaughter of a woman engineer (and also someone who struggles to assemble her Ikea furniture but loves her new toolkit anyway), it was an honor to be surrounded by tradeswomen at the Institute for Women and Work’s panel last Thursday night up at Cornell.  We were gathered to discuss how the economic crisis and recovery efforts in New York impact women, particularly tradeswomen.  For me, though, it was an education in a history I didn’t even know existed: the history of tradeswomen in the U.S. and their fight for recognition and rights.  After 30 years of activism, women still only comprise 3% of the construction labor force.   As one panelist said, “do we really believe that men have 97% of the answers?”  I think not. Although frustration with this slow-moving progress was evident in the room, the Cornell event was more celebratory than anything else. Susan Eisenberg shared slides from her multi-media installation, On Equal Terms.   The theme of the installation: Women in construction—30 years and still organizing.  The most provocative exhibit was the bathroom shack, literally a 6 foot by 6 foot plywood replica of a typical bathroom tradeswoman encounter on the job, complete with documented misogynistic and explicitly sexual graffiti. 


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Media and Popular Culture: A Catch-22

May 21, 2009 posted by admin

Mass media is the heart of many current debates; however, the nature of the media remains double-edged. On a positive side, blogging and other forms of on-line communication have become key aspects of today’s feminist outreach. On line gender related activism and strive for change challenge and supplement the mainstream media. For example, check out this post from Racialicious (fyi, the editor of this fantastic blog is one of our panelists):


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