International Education

Women’s education is one of the most powerful tools available for alleviating poverty, strengthening democratic governance and advancing sustainable development. Research shows investments in educating girls and women correlate with health improvements, including decreased infant mortality, better child nutrition and increased family income. Despite progress, many more boys than girls attend secondary school and post-secondary school in some parts of the world, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. More effort needs to be invested in making quality education available to all people around the globe: girls and boys, women and men, from pre-school to adult education.

Women MBAs: Quick Takes

URL: 
http://www.catalyst.org/publication/250/women-mbas

The Ever Increasing Majority of Women Graduates

According to a recent OECD report, Higher Education to 2030, women will become an even larger majority of the graduate talent pool in only one decade. Companies are already having to ensure that they don’t swing the gender balance too far in favor of women. However, it must be noted that women primarily study the social sciences, while men study engineering.
 

URL: 
http://www.20-first.com/778-0-trend-of-women-as-the-majority-of-talented-will-continue.html

Girls’ Education in the 21st Century: Gender Equality, Empowerment, and Economic Growth

Much has been done to increase gender equality in education over the past 15 years. National governments and the international community have followed through on promises made in various international forums to increase investments in girls’ education. Overall female enrollment at the primary level in low-income countries has accordingly grown from 87 percent in 1990 to 94 percent in 2004, considerably shrinking the gender gap. This progress is the result of recognition of centrality of girls’ education in development and the overall progress made under the Education for All (EFA) agenda.
 

URL: 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EDUCATION/Resources/278200-1099079877269/547664-1099080014368/DID_Girls_edu.pdf

GIRLS FORUM: Navigating Girlhood to Womanhood from New Moon’s Nancy Gruver

February 5, 2009 posted by admin We asked activists and scholars in the girl’s rights movement to draft a letter to President Obama, outlining their Girls Agenda for 2009.  Here’s what Nancy Gruver, founder and CEO of New Moon Magazine had to say: Dear President Obama: As Malia and Sasha’s proud father I don’t need to tell you how having daughters can give you new eyes on the world.  My daughters, Mavis and Nia, are adults now.  But it feels like just last week that they were ten years old and I was worrying about how to help them navigate the treacherous journey from girlhood to womanhood.  We started New Moon Girls magazine together to give girls a place to express themselves and make the world better. I believe you agree that growing up should mean increasing opportunities as well as responsibilities for our daughters.  It should mean increasing respect and rewards for their intelligence, creativity, and skills.  It should mean they have access to equal education and healthcare, including effective pregnancy prevention.  It should mean they have the freedom to walk down the street or go on a date without worrying they might be attacked just because they are female.


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