Higher Education

While women have made enormous strides in higher education, progress has been uneven. Women now receive a majority of undergraduate degrees but disparities remain, particularly at graduate, doctoral and post-doctoral levels. Colleges and universities still reflect inequities based on race, ability, geography and income. And more efforts must focus on advancing women and women of color into tenured and leadership positions with institutions of higher learning. There is growing concern about the rising cost of higher education and how to improve quality and access. The financial crisis of 2008-09 has shrunk many endowment funds and reduced the number of scholarships available as well as making state and community colleges more competitive and less accessible. The effects of corporatization on college campuses are also a source of concern for the quality and independence of scholarship, including for women’s studies and other inter-disciplinary programs.

FAST FACT: Black Women's Health Care Access and Educational Attainment Rising

By Josephina Ragon* 

Last week, I waited eagerly on the steps of City Hall to get the latest facts on the status of black women and girls. The Law and Policy Group, Inc. released their 2010 Bi-Annual report to a crowd of fellow non-profits, media, and interested citizens. According to Executive Director and Founder Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, the report gives the public a picture of an “African-American female as a whole person—a snapshot of her life.” This particular study is the only ongoing national report on the current state of black females in the United States.

The research not only covers the challenges faced by black women today, but also their achievements thus far. For example,


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Girls Discovered: Global Maps of Adolescent Girls

What do we know about girls?


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Spring Promotion Social

Date/Time: 
04/23/2010

Come celebrate the promotion and tenure of women faculty members!

Location: Caine House

Contact: Wendy Holliday (435) 797-0731

 

Women Making Gains on Faculty at Harvard

 

By TAMAR LEWIN

 

Published: March 12, 2010

 

 

Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

In an era when women are increasingly prominent in medicine, law and business, why are there so few women scientists and engineers? A new research report by AAUW presents compelling evidence that can help to explain this puzzle. Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics presents in-depth yet accessible profiles of eight key research findings that point to environmental and social barriers – including stereotypes, gender bias and the climate of science and engineering departments in colleges and universities – that continue to block women’s participation and progress in science, technology, engineering, and math. The report also includes up to date statistics on girls' and women's achievement and participation in these areas and offers new ideas for what each of us can do to more fully open scientific and engineering fields to girls and women.

URL: 
http://www.aauw.org/resource/why-so-few-women-in-science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics/

Why So Few?

Date/Time: 
03/25/2010

In an era when women are increasingly prominent in medicine, law, and business, why are there so few women scientists and engineers?

Drawing upon a large and diverse body of research, AAUW’s report provides compelling evidence of environmental and social barriers—including gender bias, stereotypes, and the climate within college and university science and engineering departments—that continue to limit women’s participation and progress.

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