Higher Education

While women have made enormous strides in higher education, progress has been uneven. Women now receive a majority of undergraduate degrees but disparities remain, particularly at graduate, doctoral and post-doctoral levels. Colleges and universities still reflect inequities based on race, ability, geography and income. And more efforts must focus on advancing women and women of color into tenured and leadership positions with institutions of higher learning. There is growing concern about the rising cost of higher education and how to improve quality and access. The financial crisis of 2008-09 has shrunk many endowment funds and reduced the number of scholarships available as well as making state and community colleges more competitive and less accessible. The effects of corporatization on college campuses are also a source of concern for the quality and independence of scholarship, including for women’s studies and other inter-disciplinary programs.

House Republican Spending Cuts in H.R. 1 Devastating To Women, Families and the Economy

The bill to fund – and de-fund – the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2011, H.R. 1, passed the House on February 19, 2011, on a party-line vote (all but three Republicans voting voted for the bill; all Democrats voting voted against it). The bill slashes funding for services vital to women and girls at every stage in their lives, from early childhood to K-12, through their working and childbearing years, and into old age. In addition, the bill prohibits the federal government from enforcing important legal protections for women.

To find out more about how H.R. 1 affects women and families, read the National Women's Law Center's Fact Sheet.

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/hr1factsheetfeb2011_2.pdf

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
38° 54' 24.5736" N, 77° 2' 33.6012" W

Dr. Mary Gatta is currently a Senior Scholar, at Wider Opportunities for Women. Prior to that she served as a Director, Gender and Workforce Policy at the Center for Women and Work, and on the faculty in the Department of Labor Studies and Employment Relations at Rutgers University. She holds a PhD and M.A. in Sociology from Rutgers University and a B.A. in Social Science from Providence College. Her areas of expertise include gender and public policy, low wage workers, earnings inequality, and evaluation research on workforce projects.

Location

Washington, DC 20036
United States
38° 54' 24.5736" N, 77° 2' 33.6012" W

FAST FACT: Student Aid Insufficient to Cover Rising Costs

In 2008, families in the lowest income bracket needed to sacrafice 55 percent of their annual income to send their child to a four-year public university.  In comparison, a family in the top income bracket spent only 9 percent.  As wages continue to stagnate and tuition costs rise, college education has become out of reach for many women and low-income families.

Increasing student aid to fill the gap between rising college costs and decreasing median family income is critical to ensuring that higher education is affordable to low-income students.

To learn more, download our latest fact sheet, Increasing Student Aid--Making Higher Education Accessible to Women and Low-Income Students


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NCRW Fact Sheet: Increasing Student Aid—Making Higher Education Accessible to Women and Low-Income Students

As wages continue to stagnate and tuition costs rise, college education has become out of reach for many women and low-income families. Increasing student aid to fill the gap between rising college costs and decreasing median family income is critical to ensuring that higher education is affordable to low-income students.

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Dr. Mariko Chang is the author of the new book, Shortchanged: Why Women Have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It, and the main author of the March 2010 report “Lifting as We Climb Women of Color, Wealth, and America’s Future.” Dr. Chang has a PhD in Sociology from Stanford University and was an Associate Professor of Sociology at Harvard University from 1998 to 2007 where she published work on occupational sex segregation across countries, the use of social networks for gathering financial information and began her work on the gender wealth gap. To help raise awareness of the wealth gap, she maintains a website that provides data and other information on wealth, assets, and debt for public policy makers, the media, researchers, and organizations that address economic security.
 

Location

Boston, MA
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

The Power of Girls

 *By Julie Zeilinger


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