Caregiving

Compared to men, women spend a disproportionate amount of time attending to the needs of children and adults under their care.. Because of caregiving demands, more than half of employed women caregivers have made special workplace arrangements, such as arriving late, leaving early or working fewer hours. Women represent 61 percent of all caregivers and 75 percent of caregivers who report feeling very strained emotionally, physically or financially by such responsibilities. Minor-aged women and girls also shoulder caregiving duties, usually unrecognized and uncompensated. Affordable, accessible, quality child care and elder care, as well as greater delegation of responsibilities to spouses and partners, are required to offset the overwhelming care loads within families and communities.

Stay-At-Home-Without-Options

January 21, 2009 posted by Linda Basch I want to draw your attention to a moving commentary by Deborah Siegel, “Masculine Mystique, Meet Feminine Mistake,” posted at the Women’s Media Center, in which she raises questions as to why the media seems to latch onto outmoded models of marriage roles, where men are the breadwinners and women are the caretakers of  home and family.  This raised in my mind another scenario we also are seeing today: the high cost of child care.  In this scenario, one or the other of the parenting couple opts to stay home to care for home and family.  Then, what happens when the working partner gets laid off?  As in Deborah’s case, though Deborah works fulltime, those families also fall into a tailspin


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NEXT GENERATION FORUM--Moving towards New Leadership and Opening New Possibilities

December 5, 2008 posted by admin

Kyla Bender-Baird: What are your wildest dreams for Michelle Obama's four years in the White House?  (What alternate title for her might you suggest instead of "First Lady"?  What would her ideal role be?)  


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Fair Pay: The Time is NOW!

November 21, 2008 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird [caption id="attachment_722" align="alignleft" width="258" caption="Ellen Bravo, Lilly Ledbetter, Pamela Stone"]Ellen Bravo, Lilly Ledbetter, Pamela Stone[/caption] Despite years of legislative lobbying, grassroots activism, and extensive research, the gender wage gap has remained largely unchanged in the past two decades.  Women on average still earn 77 cents on the dollar compared to men and are often marginalized in minimum-wage jobs.  Having children, furthermore, increases men’s earning potential while decreasing women’s incomes.  To address these continuing inequalities, the Equal Pay Coalition NYC—spearheaded by the New York Women’s Agenda —gathered a panel of experts and activists at Hunter College Wednesday morning.  Partners for the event included the National Council for Research on Women and the National Women’s Law Center. Maria Hinojosa, managing editor of PBS, moderated.  The panel included Ellen Bravo (former director of 9to5, National Association of Working Women), Edward Ott (Executive Director of the New York City Central Labor Council), Donna Pedro (a diversity compensation expert), Dr. Pamela Stone (professor of gender equity) and Lilly Ledbetter whose Title VII pay discrimination lawsuit rejuvenated the movement for pay equity.

In her opening remarks, Jennifer Raab—President of Hunter College—stated that fair pay is a foundation of equal rights.  The New York City Council passed two resolutions last year demanding equal pay at state and federal levels.  A recent GAO report, however, found that a 20% pay gap has remained consistent throughout the past 20 years.


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Council and Boise Member Center Address Women in Idaho

October 28, 2008. Posted by Linda Basch, President, National Council for Research on Women I'm pleased to share with you an op-ed I co-authored with Lisa McClain, Director of Gender Studies at Boise State University, appearing in today's Idaho Statesman.  The piece begins like this: Women, who are being aggressively courted by both campaigns, have much at stake in this election. Now that attention has turned from lipstick to the economy, perhaps we can start a dialogue on what really matters to women voters in Idaho. This election season has prompted many in the press, and even among women themselves, to wonder out loud: Can women "have it all"?


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Taxes Are STILL a Women's Issue

October 24, 2008 posted by Linda Basch

 


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Why Women are Poor in Retirement

Oct 15, 2008 WHY WOMEN ARE POOR IN RETIREMENT By Cindy Hounsell President of the Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement As the candidates get ready for their debate tonight, there are a few things I would like to tell them. First, Social Security is intended to replace approximately 40 percent of an average earner’s wages, but many women rely on it as their primary or only source of retirement income. This is one of the major reasons why so many women are poor or near poor.


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Welcome to The REAL DEAL Blog

Sept 29, 2008 posted by Linda Basch WELCOME! Welcome to The REAL DEAL, the National Council for Research on Women's new blog on issues that matter to women.  As I write this first post in the heat of election season and during a time of unprecedented financial turmoil, my thoughts go out to all who are feeling unnerved and confused.  I'm thinking of those who risk losing their jobs, or who are uncertain about their businesses and have rents to pay and families to support, and of those who don't quite know where to turn for help. This is a time when we hope for a leadership that can explain and clarify what's at stake, reassure us of a real commitment, and give us some clear steps for going forward.  And we at the Council are watching with an eagle's eye.


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