Poverty

Women are more likely to be poor than men, both in the United States and across the globe. Female-headed households are more liable to live in poverty. Families headed by single women in the US are more than twice as likely as other families to be poor. The poverty divide is even more dramatic for people of color: in the US, African-American (26.5 percent) and Latina women (23.6 percent) register much higher poverty rates than white women (11.6 percent). Evidence-based, research-driven policies and programs that recognize the diverse realities of poverty and attack its root causes are critical for producing change.

Fact Sheet: Empowering Women in Agriculture

 Rural women around the world play a key role in supporting their households and communities in achieving food and nutrition security, generating income, growing small businesses, and overall well-being. They contribute to agriculture and fuel local and global economies. As such, women are active players in achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

Yet every day, rural women and girls face persistent structural constraints that prevent them from fully enjoying their human rights, and hamper their efforts to improve their lives and the lives of those around them.

From Bread for the World

URL: 
http://www.bread.org/what-we-do/resources/fact-sheets/empowering-women-in-agriculture.pdf

Indigenous Women's Dialogue - Roundtable Report on the Accessibility of Plan B as an Over The Counter (OTC) Within Indian Health Service - February 2012

In most of the United States, a woman 17 years or older who needs Plan B, an emergency contraceptive that can prevent pregnancy up to 72 hours after intercourse, can walk up to a pharmacy counter and request it without a prescription.

 
But for Native American women served by the Indian Health Service, obtaining Plan B might require a drive of hundreds of miles, a wait beyond the pill's window of effectiveness, and a price beyond what the IHS would charge.
 
URL: 
http://www.nativeshop.org/images/stories/media/pdfs/Plan-B-Report.pdf

Building Women’s Meaningful Participation in the Scale-Up of Vertical Transmission Programmes

 The Center for Women Policy Studies is very pleased to share with you the Briefing Paper from our sisters at the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS (GCWA) and the AIDS Legal Network (ALN), South Africa. 

URL: 
http://www.womenandaids.net/CMSPages/GetFile.aspx?guid=c7ce0acd-8ac1-4c34-9098-c77096279025&disposition=inline

World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development

 The 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development finds that women's lives around the world have improved dramatically, but gaps remain in many areas. The authors use a conceptual framework to examine progress to date, and then recommend policy actions.

URL: 
http://go.worldbank.org/CQCTMSFI40

Engendering agricultural research, development, and extension

 Research has shown that women, when given the capital and opportunity, make unique, positive contributions to development outcomes ranging from agricultural productivity to poverty reduction. It comes as little surprise, then, that agricultural research, development, and extension systems are generally more successful when scientists, researchers, and extension agents pay attention to gender issues. However, women continue to be underrepresented and underserved, and their contributions remain mostly untapped in national and international agricultural research. Worldwide, gender roles are culturally defined in all aspects of farming, from control of resources to production and marketing, and these definitions constrain and marginalize women. Even within the agricultural research community, most scientists and extension agents are male.

URL: 
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/engendering-agricultural-research-development-and-extension
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