Poverty

Women are more likely to be poor than men, both in the United States and across the globe. Female-headed households are more liable to live in poverty. Families headed by single women in the US are more than twice as likely as other families to be poor. The poverty divide is even more dramatic for people of color: in the US, African-American (26.5 percent) and Latina women (23.6 percent) register much higher poverty rates than white women (11.6 percent). Evidence-based, research-driven policies and programs that recognize the diverse realities of poverty and attack its root causes are critical for producing change.

FAST FACT: Women and Poverty in the Nation's Capital

December 9, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

The DC Women's Agenda, a program of Wider Opportunities for Women, recently released a gender analysis of the 2008 American Community Survey. They found that women remain in poverty even while working. Here are some of the stats they shared:

  • Women are eight times more likely to live in poverty than men in D.C.
  • Approximately 22% of women-headed households, working full or part time, live in poverty
  • Gender income disparities persist as men who worked full-time had an 8.5% increase in salary from 2007 to 2008 while their female counterparts had only a 2.3% increase.

To read the full report, click here.


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Josephine Ho: The Criminalization of Economic and Sexual Underclasses

An excerpt from a lecture delivered at "Towards a Vision of Sexual and Economic Justice," an event held on November 29, 2007 at Barnard College.

Video URL: 
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Engendering Justice: Women, Prisons and Change

In the last decade, we have witnessed the population of incarcerated women increase to 400 percent. Building on this development, Rebecca Haimowitz reflects on the interlinkage between incarceration and issues such as race, class, education, national identity, and gender conformity. 

Video URL: 

Reinvesting in Women and Families: Developing an Economy for the Future (Summit October 2010)

Economic Security Summit
October 8, 2010
 [BY INVITATION ONLY]

Sponsored By:

 

Project: CEW is working at the local level to increase welfare recipients' access to higher education

Project: CEW is working at the local level to increase welfare recipients' access to higher education, in collaboration with the Department of Human services, the county workforce development agency, area colleges and universities, and the Center for Civil Justice in Saginaw, MI.

URL: 
http://www.umich.edu/~cew/

Domestic violence, economic abuse, and implications of a program for building economic resources for low-income women: findings from interviews with participants in a women's economic action program

"Domestic violence, economic abuse, and implications of a program for building economic resources for low-income women: findings from interviews with participants in a women's economic action program," by Cynthia K. Sanders, St. Louis: Washington University, Center for Social Development, 2007

URL: 
http://genderstudies.boisestate.edu/

Issue Brief: "Strengthening Income and Work Supports"

Included in "A Platform for Progress: Building a Better Future for Women and Their Families/Building Economic Security" A policy summary on Earned Income Tax Credit and reform of welfare policies and administration.

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/details.cfm?id=3318&section=infocenter

Issue Brief: “Ensuring Access to High-Quality, Affordable Child Care”

Issue Brief: "Ensuring Access to High-Quality, Affordable Child Care"
Included in "A Platform for Progress: Building a Better Future for Women and Their Families and Building Economic Security."

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/details.cfm?id=3318&section=infocenter

Report: “Women and Paid Sick Days: Crucial for Family Well-Being” Vicky Lovell 2007

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/pdf/B254_paidsickdaysFS.pdf

Report: “Climbing the Ladder: How to Invest in New Jersey’s Working Families,”

Produced with partner organization, NJ Policy Perspective as part of The Working Poor Families Project (WPFP), a national initiative aimed at assessing state policies and programs designed to help low-income working families achieve economic security.

URL: 
http://www.cww.rutgers.edu/News_Articles/rpt_ladder%5b1%5d.pdf
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