Poverty

Women are more likely to be poor than men, both in the United States and across the globe. Female-headed households are more liable to live in poverty. Families headed by single women in the US are more than twice as likely as other families to be poor. The poverty divide is even more dramatic for people of color: in the US, African-American (26.5 percent) and Latina women (23.6 percent) register much higher poverty rates than white women (11.6 percent). Evidence-based, research-driven policies and programs that recognize the diverse realities of poverty and attack its root causes are critical for producing change.

National Council of Women’s Organizations Launches “Respect, Protect, Reject” Campaign

This post was originally featured on the Institute for Women's Policy Research Blog on July 19, 2011. 

 

By Heidi Reynolds-Stenson


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
45° 31' 7.7808" N, 122° 40' 32.4516" W

 A firm believer in the power and potential of all girls and young women, Jeannette Pai-Espinosa assumed leadership of The National Crittenton Foundation in January of 2007. Jeannette brings to the 129-year-old institution more than 30 years of experience in strategic communication, advocacy, education, intercultural communication, public policy, strategic communication, program development, public will building, community engagement and direct service delivery. Today she leads The Foundation in providing capacity building, strategic partnership development, national advocacy and communication support to the 26 members of the Crittenton family of agencies providing services in 31 states and the District of Columbia.

Location

Portland, OR 97204
United States
45° 31' 7.7808" N, 122° 40' 32.4516" W

Budget Battles and Medicaid: Reframing the Debate

By Melissa Stevenson

As an ever-growing proportion of state budgets and the second biggest state expenditure after education, Medicaid presents itself as an easy target when budget cuts are imminent. Wider Opportunities for Women’s recent webinar on June 30th, “Budget Battles: Threats to Medicaid,” summarized the threats posed to Medicaid with presentations from Angela Shubert and Jen Beeson from Families USA, Renata Pore from the West Virginia Center for Budget and Policy, and Andy McDonald of BerlinRosen Public Affairs. The webinar discussion delved into how advocates can shift the perception of Medicaid among politicians and the public by reframing the conversation surrounding the Medicaid program.


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Changing Workplace Scheduling as an Anti-Poverty Strategy

By Melissa Stevenson

At the June 22nd brown bag lunch, “Changing Workplace Scheduling as an Anti-Poverty Strategy,” sponsored by Half in Ten and the Women of Color Policy Network at NYU Wagner, presenter Joan Williams discussed how erratic workplace scheduling policies prevent many low-income parents from maintaining regular employment. She believes that anti-poverty policies that focus entirely on workforce readiness may be misplaced; instead, the problem rests with the employers and companies who use outdated workplace scheduling practices that make it impossible for low-income workers to be both an ideal worker and a responsible parent.


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Protecting Programs for Low-Income People in Deficit Reduction Plans Is Vital to Women and Their Families

 This report explains why the principle that any deficit reduction plan must protect programs for low-income people and not increase poverty is critical for women and their families.  It provides specific information about the importance of programs such as Medicaid, child care assistance, Head Start, SNAP, WIC, TANF, SSI, Pell grants, rental assistance, LIHEAP, and many others to protect women’s health, provide supports for children, improve nutrition, maintain income and work supports, expand educational opportunities, and make housing more affordable.

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/resource/protecting-programs-low-income-people-deficit-reduction-plans-vital-women-and-their-familie
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