Economic Development & Microfinance

Women contribute actively to economic development and sustainability. Their social status determines their access to opportunities for economic autonomy and advancement. In the US, the glass ceiling is still firmly in place in many sectors of the economy. Globally, economic development efforts are doomed to failure without women’s active involvement and participation. More efforts need to focus on empowering women as wage earners, entrepreneurs and business owners. Microfinance programs also offer great potential to lift women out of poverty.

Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice

Volume 16, Number 1, March 2004

Symposium: Women, Human Security
and Globalization

Special Editor: Linda Basch, National Council for Research on Women

Contents:

Linda Basch, Human Security, Globalization, and Feminist Visions
Mary Robinson, An Ethical, Human-Rights Approach to Globalization
Kristen Timothy, Human Security Discourse at the United Nations
Sadako Ogata, The Human Security Commission's Strategy
Charlotte Bunch, A Feminist Human Rights Lens
Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, Gender, Globalization and New Threats to Human Security
J. Ann Tickner, Feminist Responses to International Security Studies
Deborah L. Rhode, Gender and the U.S. Human Rights Record
Leith Mullings, Domestic Policy and Human Security in the U.S.
Gwyn Kirk and Margo Okazawa-Rey, Women Opposing U.S. Militarism in East Asia
Sally L. Kitch and Margaret A. Mills, Appropriating Women's Agendas

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Symposium: Women, Human Security and Globalization

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Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass — and Why it Matters

For more than a quarter century, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, the Council brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

Our report, Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass – and Why it Matters, explores the under-representation of women in the field, draws on research suggesting the benefits women can bring, and lays out concrete action steps for change. Specifically, we call on the financial services industry to develop a “critical mass principle” with quantifiable benchmarks and guidelines for increasing the number of women at all leadership levels.

Teaser: 

For more than a quarter century, Re:Gender (formerly National Council for Research on Women) has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, Re:Gender brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

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