Communications, Media & Gender

Mainstream media and the communications sector are still largely male-dominated in management, ownership and representation. Women hold only 3 percent of leadership positions in the sector. And despite the parity of female and male graduates from journalism schools in the U.S., women reporters on average make $9,000 less per year than their male cohorts. New media and the internet are offering new opportunities for women’s involvement, with an estimated 7.3 million more women online than men and 23 million women who use blogs, including the emerging “momosphere,” or moms who blog. A vibrant feminist media is building alliances to combat sexism and amplify voices and critical viewpoints. Initiatives from our network, such as SheSource and the Women’s Media Center, are aiming to address the absence of women as experts and opinion leaders in the public sphere.

Reality on MTV: Gender Portrayals on MTV Reality Programming

In a new report, the Parents Television Council examines the good, the bad and the ugly of MTV’s most-watched reality programming. PTC’s new study, “Reality on MTV: Gender Portrayals on MTV Reality Programming” is based on a content analysis of the most popular primetime cable reality shows among children and teens ages 12 to 17 during the 2011 TV season. The top four programs all aired on MTV and include: “Jersey Shore,” “Real World,” “Teen Mom 2” and “16 and Pregnant.” To view PTC’s full report, click here

URL: 
http://www.parentstv.org/PTC/publications/reports/MTV-RealityStudy/main.asp

Gender Inequality in Popular Films: Examining On Screen Portrayals and Behind-the-Scenes Employment Patterns in Motion Pictures Released between 2007-2009

A new study by USC Annenberg researchers Stacy Smith, Marc Choueitiand Stephanie Gall surveys the top 100 grossing movies of 2009 and shows Hollywood's addiction to films that marginalize and sexualize women is as strong as ever.
 
The study, "Gender Inequality in Popular Films," can be found here (PDF).
 
Perhaps most troubling were the findings about young teen characters. Professor Smith and her research team of undergraduate students found the same prevalence of sexually revealing clothing and partial nudity in female characters in all age groups from 13 to 39.
URL: 
http://annenberg.usc.edu/Faculty/Communication%20and%20Journalism/~/media/4F2F5F5CD74C43948A7D245CC421714B.ashx
Syndicate content