Work:life Balance

Flexible work arrangements and policies that address caregiving roles result in paybacks for both employers and employees. Research shows that employees with a satisfying work/life balance are more productive, creative, innovative and motivated at work and are less likely to leave their positions. Flexibility also encourages gender diversity in the workplace by easing the way for women to stay on their chosen career tracks while providing caregiving to children and family members or pursuing other interests and responsibilities.

NATIONAL PARENTS' DAY FORUM: Observing National Parents’ Day by Enabling All Families to Thrive

 July 29, 2009 posted by Linda Basch
Last Sunday marked the 15th annual observance of National Parents’ Day, a holiday established to “uplift ideal parental role models.” Originally introduced into Congress by Senator Trent Lott, in 1994, then-President Bill Clinton formally established the fourth Sunday of July as National Parents’ Day. Generally, this holiday is used to promote the image of two-parent, “traditional” families.


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NCRW Summary of White House Workplace Flexibility Forum

March 31, 2010: Government officials, labor organizers, private sector leaders, and top researchers gathered this afternoon at the White House for a special forum on workplace flexibility. Breakout sessions on best practices for implementing flexible work options were bookended by appearances by the Obamas. For those of us unable to attend in person, the White House live-streamed the opening and closing sessions on its website.

As Valerie Jarrett, Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, said in her opening remarks, the presence of Michelle and Barack Obama at today’s forum sends a message on the importance of workplace flexibility. The forum’s purpose was to look at what works and what does not work in flexible work option policies in the public sector. The White House encourages the private sector to follow suit.
 

The White House Gets It—How About the Rest of the Nation?

By Kyla Bender-Baird

As the economy came toppling down on us last year, one of the first things to get sidelined was workplace flexibility and policies supporting greater work-life balance. Some say that with the economy struggling to recover, now is not the time to talk about so-called perks like telecommuting or flexible hours. But the White House and its top officials couldn’t disagree more.


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Women in IT: The Facts (2009)

The technology industry is one of the fastest-growing industries in the U.S.  The United States Department of Labor estimates that by 2016 there will be more than 1.5 million computer-related jobs available. Technology job opportunities are predicted to grow at a faster rate than jobs in all other professional sectors, or up to 25 percent over the next decade.

Highly-qualified women are well-positioned to move into these open jobs, yet the industry is failing to attract this talent. Furthermore, women already employed in the technology industry are leaving at staggering rates. Failing to capitalize on this talent threatens U.S. productivity, innovation, and competitiveness. To further strengthen the U.S. position as a technical leader we need to examine the reasons why the industry is not attracting more people with varied backgrounds and take action to stem the current tide.

URL: 
http://www.ncwit.org/pdf/NCWIT_WomenInITFacts_FINAL.pdf

The Recruitment, Retention & Advancement of Senior Technical Women

On October 1, 2009, 59 senior technology executives participated in the Anita Borg Institute’s 2009 Technical Executive Forum.

Even though an acknowledgement was made that the pipeline of technical women with technical degrees coming out of academia was insufficient, the group commented that the women who do graduate from these programs are not joining organizational cultures that are as receptive as they could be to gender diversity. This cultural disconnect was highlighted through the discussion of five main components.

1. The existing technical culture is biased against “those who don’t code”

2. The existing technical culture rewards “Hero” behavior and an “in your face” communication style

3. Risk-aversion is embedded in recruiting and advancement practices

4. The individual contributor track lacks a development culture

URL: 
http://anitaborg.org/files/breaking-barriers-to-cultural-change-in-corps.pdf

Senior Technical Women: A Profile of Success

A growing body of research has documented the underrepresentation of women in technical positions in US companies. Women hold 24 percent of technology jobs, yet represent half the total workforce. This underrepresentation persists even though the demand for technical talent remains high: computer occupations are expected to grow by 32 percent between 2008 and 2018.

In 2008, the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology and the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University conducted a survey of 1,795 technical men and women at seven high-technology companies in Silicon Valley. In this paper, we focus on senior technical women, who at only 4 percent of our sample represent a rarity in the technology industry.

URL: 
http://anitaborg.org/files/Senior-Technical-Women-A-Profile-of-Success.pdf
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