Diversity & Inclusion

Recruiting and retaining a work force that is diverse in gender, race and other markers of difference provides businesses and organizations with innovative ideas and a competitive edge. Diversity provides a significant advantage in competing for clients, customers and suppliers in today’s global marketplace. NCRW is supporting diversity efforts by recommending best practices for recruiting, retaining and advancing the careers of women, particularly women of color. This research extends to examining the benefits of diversity in leadership and how women’s participation improves decision-making. NCRW is helping companies to assess their workplace environments and identify barriers to inclusion: from practices, to policies, to the informal culture of organizations. NCRW’s Corporate Circle supports companies in their efforts to strengthen and advance policies that boost diversity and inclusion.

Expanding Work-Life Perspectives: Talent Management in Asia

Despite increased interest, the topic of work-life effectiveness in Asia has remained relatively under-explored in the research literature, especially in terms of how to best implement work-life practices in different cultural contexts and within specific local economies.
 
Expanding Work-Life Perspectives: Talent Management in Asia contributes to our knowledge of how organizations can best implement work-life programs in the region by focusing on the experiences of 1,834 high-potential employees working in Asia for U.S.- or European-based multinational organizations.
URL: 
http://catalyst.org/publication/530/expanding-work-life-perspectives-talent-management-in-asia

Pay Matters: The Positive Economic Impacts of Paid Family Leave for Families, Businesses and the Public

With a growing need for family-friendly workplace policies, a new study commissioned by the National Partnership for Women & Families, with support from the Rockefeller Foundation, concludes that providing paid family leave to workers leads to positive economic outcomes for working families, businesses and the public.
 
The research, conducted by the Center for Women and Work at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, finds that women who use paid leave are far more likely to be working nine to 12 months after a child’s birth than those who do not take any leave.
URL: 
http://smlr.rutgers.edu/paymatters-cwwreport-january2012
Syndicate content