Diversity & Inclusion

Recruiting and retaining a work force that is diverse in gender, race and other markers of difference provides businesses and organizations with innovative ideas and a competitive edge. Diversity provides a significant advantage in competing for clients, customers and suppliers in today’s global marketplace. NCRW is supporting diversity efforts by recommending best practices for recruiting, retaining and advancing the careers of women, particularly women of color. This research extends to examining the benefits of diversity in leadership and how women’s participation improves decision-making. NCRW is helping companies to assess their workplace environments and identify barriers to inclusion: from practices, to policies, to the informal culture of organizations. NCRW’s Corporate Circle supports companies in their efforts to strengthen and advance policies that boost diversity and inclusion.

Gender (In)equality in the Labor Market: An Overview of Global Trends and Developments

This report looks at the global gender pay gap, the effects of the current global economic downturn on women’s pay and employment, and the impact of violence against women in society. In 20 countries, the average gender pay gap is 22.4 per cent, and the gap generally widens with age. The global economic downturn is negatively affecting women, and violence against women has a direct and detrimental impact on the victim’s access to paid work.


Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Day


Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Day

UN Global and UNIFEM Consider International Application of The Calvert Women’s Principles

The Calvert Women’s Principles (CWP) were a focal point of a forum convened by the United Nations Global Compact and the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), entitled Advancing Women in the Global Marktplace.


Planning for Tomorrow’s Boardroom: Making Room for More Women

A consistent pattern shown by these data is that larger companies are more likely than smaller companies to have one or more women on their boards of directors, a fact that has been documented by all ION members every year.


Gender is a Hot Topic in Asia Too

Asia is probably the region of the world that is both furthest ahead and farthest behind on the gender issue. In Singapore, many women are in management, while in Japan, less than 10% of management positions are held by women. Yet in both locations, the issue of gender is emerging as a key business lever.


Half the Talent: Unrealistic Expectations Prevent Women in the Netherlands from Reaching the Top

Top Managers in the Netherlands believe that the only way to reach the top for a woman is to act like a man without showing it. Senior managers currently are reluctant to recruit new women top managers.


To Make Investors Happy, Hire a Woman as CFO?

New research suggests that certain actions by companies create more shareholder value when a woman, not a man is at the finance helm.


A Business Case for Women

Companies that hire and retain more women not only are doing the right thing but can also gain a competitive edge. They can take several basic steps to achieve even greater parity.  These companies will be able to draw from a broader pool of talent in an era of talent shortages. What’s more, research shows a correlation between high numbers of female senior executives and stronger financial performance.


Profit, Thy Name Is…Woman?

Any action that shows a consistent correlation to high profits would probably be of interest to companies struggling to swim against the tide of these perilous economic times. But one corporate policy seems to address both diversity and profitability issues in a single blow: Over the past several years, my colleagues and I at Pepperdine University have tracked the performance of Fortune 500 companies with a strong record of promoting women to the executive suite and compared their performance to that of other firms in the same industries. The correlation between high-level female executives and business success has been consistent and revealing.


2008 Catalyst Census of Women Board Directors of the Fortune 500

Overall Representation of Women Corporate Officers and Top Earners Continues to Stagnate

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