Advancing Women's Leadership

Women currently make up 15 percent of corporate management, 16 percent of law partners, and less than 3 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs. NCRW and its partners are working to improve these numbers as they work toward a critical mass, often viewed as 30 percent representation, across sectors to benefit the economy and society through women’s talents and perspectives. Without sufficient numbers, women’s ideas, views and analyses risk being marginalized or perceived as representing a narrow minority. With greater access to opportunities and positions of influence, the likelihood of acceptance and professional success for women and people of color increases.

Panacea or Placebo: Are Women’s Networks Working for Women?



Discussion Paper - Deutsche Bundesbank: Executive board composition and bank risk taking

 Little is known about how socioeconomic characteristics of executive teams affect corporate governance in banking. Exploiting a unique dataset, we show how age, gender, and education composition of executive teams affect risk taking of financial institutions. First, we establish that age, gender, and education jointly affect the variability of bank performance. Second, we use
difference-in-difference estimations that focus exclusively on mandatory executive retirements and find that younger executive teams increase risk taking, as do board changes that result in a higher proportion of female executives. In contrast, if board changes increase the representation of executives holding Ph.D. degrees, risk taking declines.


Learning the Importance of Reciprocity in Networking

By Alissa Vladimir*

On Tuesday, March 13, the Emerging Leaders Network of the National Council for Research on Women and Philanthropy New York hosted The Nuts, Bolts & Art of Networking, a hands on networking workshop facilitated by David Schachter. Held at the offices of Philanthropy New York, and co-sponsored by NYU’s Wagner Women’s Caucus, the event featured a number of exercises in which participants paired up with one another, in an effort to engage in what Schachter calls the reciprocity of networking.

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Strengthening the diversity of top academic leaders

 Findings and insights from Egon Zehnder International’s Global Academic Leadership Survey 

Most leading academic institutions are strongly committed to diversity, a commitment visible in their policies on staff recruitment and student admissions, as well as in their academic programs. Yet how diverse are their leaders? A survey by Egon Zehnder International of over 300 top universities and research institutions worldwide shows that the most senior level of academic leadership remains overwhelmingly male and locally-born.

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