Women's & Girls' Leadership

From prime ministers to grass roots organizers, women and girls are attaining leadership positions in increasing numbers across government, civil society and the economy. But the glass ceiling is still firmly in place in many countries including in the US, where women are still vastly under-represented in government and senior leadership positions. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Unveiling the Revolutionaries: Cyberactivism and Women’s Role in the Arab Uprisings

Over the course of 2011’s momentous Arab Spring uprisings, young women in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Bahrain and Yemen used social media and cyberactivism to carve out central roles in the revolutionary struggles under way in their countries, according to a new study commissioned by Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.
 
The study, “Unveiling the Revolutionaries: Cyberactivism and Women’s Role in the Arab Uprisings,” explores the activism of several key figures, including Egypt’s Esraa Abdel Fattah, who became widely known as “Facebook girl,” as well Libya’s Danya Bashir, Bahrain’s Zeinab and Maryam al-Khawaja and Tunisia’s Lina Ben Mhenni, who became known as the uprising’s “Twit
URL: 
http://bakerinstitute.org/publications/ITP-pub-CyberactivismAndWomen-051712.pdf
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