Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Media Ignores the Importance of Housework in Divorce Rates and Career Advancement

By Londa Schiebinger and Lori Nishiura Mackenzie

ORIGINALLY POSTED MAY 23, 2010 ON THE HUFFINGTON POST

The Telegraph picked up a recently published London School of Economics research about housework. They were in lonely company. The piece did not see the light of day in the Financial Times, The New York Times or the Washington Post. Why not? Could it be that housework is not considered a serious topic?


<< Back to the Full Blog

Congressional Briefing: Making WIA Work for Women

This document includes commentary given by Carolyn Williams, Ariane Hegewisch, Susan Rees, Marie-Louise Caravatti, and Mimi Lufkin as part of a Congressional briefing about the WIA on April 7, 2010.

Question: There are currently 17 accountability measures in WIA, states complain that all the do is measure. How much more can/ should we ask of them? How does this fit into the discussions to get "common data" across federal programs?

Mimi Lufkin: Accountability measures speak to policy priorities. They are important. That said, such performance measures would not require additional data collection - this data is already being collected, it is just not being analyzed; and all the analysis would require is an additional computer programming command.

URL: 
http://iwpr.org/pdf/WIA_notes.pdf

What A Difference An X Makes: The State of Women's Health Research

Date/Time: 
07/16/2010

This scientific conference will highlight advances in sex differences research and its implications on health and disease.

Location: Barbara Jordan Conference Center, Kaiser Family Foundation, 1330 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005

The registration fee for the conference is $35 per person.

RSVP NOW! 

*For additional information, please contact Eileen Resnick at eileen@swhr.org


 

FAST FACT: Women Continue to Lag in STEM Fields

By Kyla Bender-Baird

According to the recently released American Association for University Women (AAUW) report, Why So Few?, women continue to be underrepresented in STEM fields, especially at the upper levels. True, progress has been made, but women earn only 20% of bachelor's degrees in physics, engineering and computer science. So what's the hold up? AAUW's report delves into the social and environmental factors that contribute to the underrepresentation of women in STEM professions. As AAUW explains, "biological gender differences, yet to be well understood, may play a role, [but] are not the whole story." AAUW turns instead to societal beliefs, learning environments, and gender stereotypes to explain the persistant disparities. To learn more, click here.


<< Back to the Full Blog

Syndicate content