Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

The Obama Administration

As President Obama and his team lead the nation, AAUW continues to be at the forefront of changes taking place in Washington, D.C. and beyond. On this page, you can read documents AAUW has submitted to the administration, learn more about the members of the president's cabinet, and find additional helpful resources.

From the presidential transition period to present-day, AAUW has been constantly looking for ways to move our priority issues forward. In fact, AAUW has been working closely with the president's team to ensure that breaking through educational and economic barriers for women is on top of the executive branch's agenda. Below are the latest documents AAUW has crafted in response to administration policies, as well as the initial documents AAUW submitted to the presidential transition team, which highlight our federal policy priorities and goals that we have been pursuing since President Obama took office.

 

URL: 
http://www.aauw.org/act/issue_advocacy/obamaAdministration.cfm

A Report on the Status of Women Faculty in the Schools of Science and Engineering at MIT, 2011

At MIT, we like data, especially data that advance our understanding of an important problem. In the 1990s, a group of MIT’s women faculty perceived patterns of inequitable resource allocation between them and their male colleagues.  They collected data that demonstrated and quantified the problem, and they alerted the Institute’s leadership, in a search for practical remedies.  Compelled by the evidence, MIT responded.  Today, a new Report on the Status of Women Faculty in the Schools of Science and Engineering at MIT delivers the encouraging news that the process launched by these faculty women has made a lasting, positive difference for women faculty at MIT.
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URL: 
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/images/documents/women-report-2011.pdf

Women in STEM and Negotiation

By Rebecca Chaleff*

Last Thursday, September 22nd, I went to CUNY Graduate Center’s event, “Women in Science: Negotiating a Successful Academic Career,” at the Segal Theatre, which was moderated by Dr. Gillian Small, CUNY’s Vice Chancellor for Research, and featured an animated address from keynote speaker Dr. Maribel Vazquez.  Also on board was a distinguished panel of experts, including: Dr. Dongming Cai, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, Dr. Mary Kern, Pamela Silverblatt, Esq., and Dr. Ruth Stark.  Together, they offered a wide range of personal perspectives on the main issue at hand: negotiation.


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