Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

The Rise of Women in the Creative Class

Women have become an increasingly important force in the U.S. labor market and especially in its knowledge based creative economy. Some argue that the economic crisis has tilted the playing field away from men, who have borne the brunt of blue collar job losses, and towards women, who are more concentrated in knowledge and service work. Using data from the American Community Survey (ACS) of the U.S. Census Bureau, this report provides a numbers-driven look at the status of women in today’s job market, nationally and state-by-state (plus the District of Columbia). We develop a measure of the “location premium” states which provide for women overall and for women in the Creative Class.
URL: 
http://www.martinprosperity.org/research-and-publications/publication/women-in-the-creative-class

Overcoming the Gender Gap: Women Entrepreneurs as Economic Drivers

Women who are capable of starting growth companies that serve global markets may be the nation's secret weapon for achieving sustained economic growth.

URL: 
http://www.kauffman.org/newsroom/untapped-potential-for-expanding-womens-entrepreneurship-holds-promise-to-grow-us-economy.aspx
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