Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Invisible Market Energy and Agricultural Technologies for Women's Economic Advancement

This research explores what it takes for technology initiatives, specifically in the energy and agricultural sectors, to reach and economically benefit women in developing countries through market-based strategies that have the potential for achieving scale and financial sustainability. It builds on ICRW’s landmark paper, Bridging the Gender Divide: How Technology Can Advance Women Economically, which made the case for how technologies can create pathways for strengthening women’s economic opportunities.

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/invisible-market

How Academic Biologists and Physicists View Science Outreach

 Scholars and pundits alike argue that U.S. scientists could do more to reach out to the general public. Yet, to date, there have been few systematic studies that examine how scientists understand the barriers that impede such outreach. Through analysis of 97 semi-structured interviews with academic biologists and physicists at top research universities in the United States, we classify the type and target audiences of scientists’ outreach activities. Finally, we explore the narratives academic scientists have about outreach and its reception in the academy, in particular what they perceive as impediments to these activities. We find that scientists’ outreach activities are stratified by gender and that university and disciplinary rewards as well as scientists’ perceptions of their own skills have an impact on science outreach. Research contributions and recommendations for university policy follow.

URL: 
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0036240
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