Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success (2013) explores an underappreciated part of our higher education system. The report looks at the role of community colleges in women’s education, including challenges women face in completing a certificate or degree, or in transferring to a four-year institution. The particular concerns and needs of student mothers’ and barriers women face in pursuing STEM and nontraditional fields are examined in detail. The report includes recommendations that will strengthen community colleges for all students.

URL: 
http://www.aauw.org/resource/women-in-community-colleges/

The Plastic Brain: Neoliberalism and the Neuronal Self

 Neuroscience-based representations and practices of the brain aimed at lay populations present the brain in ways that both affirm biological determinism and also celebrate plasticity, or the brain’s ability to change structure and function. Popular uses of neuroscientific theories of brain plasticity are saturated with a neoliberal vision of the subject. Against more optimistic readings of plasticity, I view the popular deployment of plasticity through the framework of governmentality. I describe how popular brain discourse on plasticity opens up the brain to personal techniques of enhancement and risk avoidance, and how it promotes a neuronal self. I situate brain plasticity in a context of biomedical neoliberalism, where the engineering and modification of biological life is positioned as essential to selfhood and citizenship.

URL: 
http://www.brown.uk.com/brownlibrary/pitts.pdf

Differences: Feminist Theory Out of Science

URL: 
http://differences.dukejournals.org/content/current

Claudine Williams: A Life in Gaming

One of the principles Williams lives by is “to give back to the community in which you have prospered.” Numerous organizations and Las Vegas institutions have benefited from her generosity, among them the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She made a commitment to help advance education in the Las Vegas valley and was among a small group of residents who started the UNLV Foundation.

URL: 
http://wrinunlv.org/research/our-history-profiles-of-nevada-women/claudine-williams/

The Plastic Brain: Neoliberalism and the Neuronal Self

Neuroscience-based representations and practices of the brain aimed at lay populations present the brain in ways that both affirm biological determinism and also celebrate plasticity, or the brain’s ability to change structure and function. Popular uses of neuroscientific theories of brain plasticity are saturated with a neoliberal vision of the subject. Against more optimistic readings of plasticity, I view the popular deployment of plasticity through the framework of governmentality. I describe how popular brain discourse on plasticity opens up the brain to personal techniques of enhancement and risk avoidance, and how it promotes a neuronal self. I situate brain plasticity in a context of biomedical neoliberalism, where the engineering and modification of biological life is positioned as essential to selfhood and citizenship.

URL: 
http://www.brown.uk.com/brownlibrary/pitts.pdf

"Queer Science"

Date/Time: 
10/03/2012

During the 2012-13 academic year, the University of Michigan's Institute for Research on Women and Gender (IRWG) presents several events tied to it's Program on Feminist Science.

This kick-off event features:

Jennifer Terry (Associate Professor of Women's Studies, UCIrvine) speaking on "Could Inter-species Affection Be a Model for Queer Science?"

Paul Vasey (Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Lethbridge) speaking on "Japanese Macaques and Samoan fa'afafine: What Cross-species and Cross-Cultural Research Tells Us about the Evolution of Non-conceptive Sex"

U-M discussants are Terri Conley (Psychology and Women's Studies) and Eric Plemons (Anthropology)

For complete information: http://irwg.research.umich.edu/funding/seed.html

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