Globalization, Human Rights & Security

Women make up a majority of the world’s poor; more than half of immigrants, refugees and casualties of armed conflicts; and they are often the first to feel the brunt of economic, political, environmental and humanitarian crises. At the same time, women are essential partners for promoting conflict resolution, reducing extremism and promoting post-conflict reconstruction and sustainable development. However, governments and international organizations often overlook the significant contributions and vital perspectives of women and girls, thereby undermining effective security policies and peace-building initiatives. Human rights advocates and security experts are calling for more efforts to invest in women, implement gender-sensitive laws and policies and ensure that women are included at decision-making tables. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development

 The 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development finds that women's lives around the world have improved dramatically, but gaps remain in many areas. The authors use a conceptual framework to examine progress to date, and then recommend policy actions.

URL: 
http://go.worldbank.org/CQCTMSFI40

Engendering agricultural research, development, and extension

 Research has shown that women, when given the capital and opportunity, make unique, positive contributions to development outcomes ranging from agricultural productivity to poverty reduction. It comes as little surprise, then, that agricultural research, development, and extension systems are generally more successful when scientists, researchers, and extension agents pay attention to gender issues. However, women continue to be underrepresented and underserved, and their contributions remain mostly untapped in national and international agricultural research. Worldwide, gender roles are culturally defined in all aspects of farming, from control of resources to production and marketing, and these definitions constrain and marginalize women. Even within the agricultural research community, most scientists and extension agents are male.

URL: 
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/engendering-agricultural-research-development-and-extension

Women 2012: Good News on Health and Education Bad News on Pay and Clout

By Natasha Cline-Thomas*

Each year, NCRW hosts an expert roundtable on the afternoon of its Awards Dinner. This year’s program Women 2012: Taking a Worldwide Reading was enlightening. It featured four leading experts who discussed findings from major national and global status reports on women and gender equality. They were: Iris Bohnet, Academic Dean, Professor of Public Policy, Director of the Women and Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School; Jeni Klugman, Director, Gender and Development, World Bank; Racquel Russell, Special Assistant to the President for Mobility and Opportunity, White House Domestic Policy Council; and Saadia Zahidi, Co-Author, World Economic Forum Gender Gap Report. Pat Mitchell, President and CEO, The Paley Center for Media moderated.


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Women, Business, and the Law

 Women, Business and the Law is a World Bank report that presents indicators based on laws and regulations affecting women's prospects as entrepreneurs and employees, in part drawing on laws contained in the Gender Law Library. Both resources can inform research and policy discussions on how to improve women's economic opportunities and outcomes.

URL: 
http://wbl.worldbank.org/
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