Economic Development & Security

Women are active players driving the economy, nationally and globally. They are important breadwinners for their families, grow most of the world’s food and are entering the formal and informal sectors of the labor market in increasing numbers. Despite their enormous contributions, women are still largely absent from leadership positions and their voices and perspectives are often missing from economic policymaking at the local, regional, national and international levels. To promote their wellbeing, women need access to adequate income and quality education to support themselves and their families. Women still earn less than men and make up a disproportionate number of the poor, both nationally and globally. In the United States, women’s wellbeing and advancement depend on their access to basic services, opportunities and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, advanced education, health care and adequate housing. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

NEW YEAR'S FORUM: Mixed Feelings on New Year's Eve

January 2, 2009 posted by Linda Basch The turn of a new year generally offers us a moment to reflect.  This year, with the U.S.


<< Back to the Full Blog

Highlights of 2008 on The Real Deal

January 2, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird The Real Deal blog at NCRW has only been live for three months. However, the posts people have shared have been so rich we thought we’d take a moment to highlight 2008 at The Real Deal for those coming to us for the first time.  During the election, we highlighted voices from Idaho, Michigan, and Ohion in our Views from the Swing States forum.


<< Back to the Full Blog

VIOLENCE FORUM: Beyond Firewood

December 19, 2008 posted by Shyama Venkateswar

An op-ed just came across our desk that we wanted to share, as part of this week's Violence Forum here at TRD.  In a Boston Globe op-ed this week, Liv Ullmann, reminds us of the violence suffered by refugees in Darfur, Nepal, and Kenya.  Writes Ullmann:

For thousands of these impoverished women and girls, gathering firewood is more than a vital chore - it is often a matter of life and death. By doing what many of us achieve by simply turning on a stove, refugee women and girls regularly fall victim to rape, assault, theft, exploitation, and even murder... It's high time we get "beyond firewood" and explore alternative fuels and cutting-edge energy technologies, such as clean-burning fuels, fuel-efficient stoves, and solar cookers, Ullmann says.  We need to reduce women’s vulnerability to violence by investing in alternative sources of fuel that do not require women to travel long distances to collect firewood. 


<< Back to the Full Blog

VIOLENCE FORUM: To End Violence Against Women, Target Misogyny

December 17, 2008 posted by admin


<< Back to the Full Blog

NEXT GENERATION FORUM--Looking Past the U.S. Borders in the Next Four Years

December 8, 2008 posted by admin

Kyla Bender-Baird: What message would you like to send to Hillary Clinton, our next likely Secretary of State?  


<< Back to the Full Blog

NEXT GENERATION FORUM--Moving towards New Leadership and Opening New Possibilities

December 5, 2008 posted by admin

Kyla Bender-Baird: What are your wildest dreams for Michelle Obama's four years in the White House?  (What alternate title for her might you suggest instead of "First Lady"?  What would her ideal role be?)  


<< Back to the Full Blog

SECRETARY OF STATE FORUM--Women Leaders from Media and Academia Salute HRC

December 2, 2008 posted by admin

“As Barack Obama introduced Hillary Clinton as his nominee for Secretary of State on Monday, the wish of many during the heated presidential primaries came true: that there would be an opportunity to use the immense skills of both to tackle the enormous problems we face. There is no question that both realize they are being handed the most delicate of assignments. With Clinton's history of working for the rights of women, we expect that she will fold into her portfolio the fate of the women of the world—those targeted by acid in Pakistan, rape in the Congo, and hunger everywhere. Until these issues of personal security are resolved, it is unlikely that so-called high-level treaties will hold.”

--Carol Jenkins, President, Women’s Media Center


<< Back to the Full Blog

<< Back to the Full Blog

TREASURY SECRETARY FORUM--Ms. Foundation President Sara Gould Advises Geithner to Bail Out Responsibly

Posted November 24, 2008 by Linda Basch

Linda Basch: What three recommendations do you have for Timothy Geithner, our next Treasury Secretary?

Sara Gould: First, we must strongly urge that the next Secretary ensure that the $700 billion bailout and other actions designed to address the economic crisis prioritize getting relief to communities that need it most. It’s not enough to rely on support for large banks to trickle down to middle and low-income people who are disproportionately affected by the plummeting economy—particularly when the banks’ share of the bailout came with few regulations and the conditions it did come with are being defied (see Naomi Klein’s article in The Nation).  Instead, the next Treasury Secretary should require that financial institutions use the bailout money for lending to consumers—instead of to boost the value of its shares. In addition to accountability and comprehensive regulations that apply to bailed-out banks and beyond, s/he should insist upon transparency and reveal exactly where the money is going and how it is being used. It is especially critical that the bailout money be used to help people who are facing or already in foreclosure—the majority of whom are likely women and people of color, as they were most likely to receive sub-prime loans in the first place. One promising option is to support FDIC chairperson Sheila Bair’s proposal to use $25 billion of the bailout to provide mortgage relief to homeowners. Her proposal would offer incentives to loan servicers to restructure mortgages, making payments more affordable. Second, an economic stimulus should be passed quickly. It should include immediate relief such as the extension of unemployment benefits as well as programs like job creation and training that will ensure economic stability for low- and middle-income people over the long-term. Any economic stimulus package should be sure to address the urgent needs of those who have been most impacted by the crisis, especially low-income women, women of color and their families. Recent statistics show that women are losing jobs at twice the rate of men. Third, we must return to a system of progressive taxation in which people with high incomes and net worth provide a larger share of tax revenues. New revenue should go towards domestic stimulus programs such as job training and infrastructure rebuilding as well as for key social and economic supports that have been eroded over the last two decades.


<< Back to the Full Blog

Fair Pay: The Time is NOW!

November 21, 2008 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird [caption id="attachment_722" align="alignleft" width="258" caption="Ellen Bravo, Lilly Ledbetter, Pamela Stone"]Ellen Bravo, Lilly Ledbetter, Pamela Stone[/caption] Despite years of legislative lobbying, grassroots activism, and extensive research, the gender wage gap has remained largely unchanged in the past two decades.  Women on average still earn 77 cents on the dollar compared to men and are often marginalized in minimum-wage jobs.  Having children, furthermore, increases men’s earning potential while decreasing women’s incomes.  To address these continuing inequalities, the Equal Pay Coalition NYC—spearheaded by the New York Women’s Agenda —gathered a panel of experts and activists at Hunter College Wednesday morning.  Partners for the event included the National Council for Research on Women and the National Women’s Law Center. Maria Hinojosa, managing editor of PBS, moderated.  The panel included Ellen Bravo (former director of 9to5, National Association of Working Women), Edward Ott (Executive Director of the New York City Central Labor Council), Donna Pedro (a diversity compensation expert), Dr. Pamela Stone (professor of gender equity) and Lilly Ledbetter whose Title VII pay discrimination lawsuit rejuvenated the movement for pay equity.

In her opening remarks, Jennifer Raab—President of Hunter College—stated that fair pay is a foundation of equal rights.  The New York City Council passed two resolutions last year demanding equal pay at state and federal levels.  A recent GAO report, however, found that a 20% pay gap has remained consistent throughout the past 20 years.


<< Back to the Full Blog

Syndicate content