Economic Development & Security

Women are active players driving the economy, nationally and globally. They are important breadwinners for their families, grow most of the world’s food and are entering the formal and informal sectors of the labor market in increasing numbers. Despite their enormous contributions, women are still largely absent from leadership positions and their voices and perspectives are often missing from economic policymaking at the local, regional, national and international levels. To promote their wellbeing, women need access to adequate income and quality education to support themselves and their families. Women still earn less than men and make up a disproportionate number of the poor, both nationally and globally. In the United States, women’s wellbeing and advancement depend on their access to basic services, opportunities and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, advanced education, health care and adequate housing. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Precarious Lives: Gender Lens on Low-Wage Work

 

 

Download Precarious Lives: Gender Lens on Low-Wage Work Primer
 

Written by: Rosa Cho; Edited by: Gail Cooper
Contributors: Mimi Abramovitz, Julia R. Henly and Stephen Pimpare
 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2013 Annual Afternoon Forum: Leading to Economic Security

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03/05/2013

Hosted by: NYU Wagner

1:30 - 3:00 p.m.
    
The Kimmel Center
Room 802 (The Shorin Studio)
New York University
60 Washington Square South
New York, NY  10012

Thank you for your interest in our 2013 Making A Difference for Women Awards Afternoon Forum. This event is filled to capacity and registration is now closed. If you would like to be contacted about NCRW events in the future, please email ncrw@regender.org.

Higher Minimum Wage to Combat Gap?

- By Gail Cooper and Isabel Jenkins -

Passed in 1965, the Equal Pay Act was lauded as a victory in the fight to end gender-based pay discrimination in the US. Fast-forward to 2014, women of all backgrounds still make less a week than men, finds a study by American Association of University Women. Both Latinas and African American women make 11 percent less their male counterparts, while the gap for White women (22 percent) and Asian women (21) was slightly higher. Although many factors contribute, the root of the wage gap may lie in the way American society views gender, families and industry.


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2014 Annual Conference

Re:Gender, formerly National Council for Research on Women, and the Center for the Education of Women at the University of Michigan hosted "Women and Economic Security: Changing Policy and Practice" in Ann Arbor from May 14-16, 2014.

This 3-day interdisciplinary, multi-sector conference focused on identifying and combating barriers that women living in poverty face as they seek economic security and mobility, and drilled down on the precarity of low-wage workers. It covered everything from tipped workers as they struggle to get employers to treat them fairly and with respect to worker centers' efforts to help low-wage workers understand relevant laws and their rights. In addition, a range of policy recommendations were generated during the conference's breakout sessions and were then provided to Michigan elected officials.

Highlights included:

Why the Farm Bill Needs a Gender Lens

On July 11th, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a version of the farm bill that eliminates all nutritional aid to hungry Americans in need, which is provided mainly through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP. Not since 1973 has Congress separated subsidies to farmers from individuals in need of food security.  At a moment when Congress is seeking substantial changes to SNAP, it is important to ask: Who exactly is affected by changes?


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Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success (2013) explores an underappreciated part of our higher education system. The report looks at the role of community colleges in women’s education, including challenges women face in completing a certificate or degree, or in transferring to a four-year institution. The particular concerns and needs of student mothers’ and barriers women face in pursuing STEM and nontraditional fields are examined in detail. The report includes recommendations that will strengthen community colleges for all students.

URL: 
http://www.aauw.org/resource/women-in-community-colleges/

Beware Those Who Blame Gender Pay Gap On Women's Choices

URL: 
http://www.forbes.com/sites/womensmedia/2011/04/12/beware-those-who-blame-womens-choices-for-gender-pay-gap/
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