Communications, Culture & Society

Popular culture and communications have a powerful influence on how gender roles are perceived and stereotypes perpetuated across society. Re:Gender and its members uncover and counter misinformation providing context and analysis about the accuracy of how the daily lives, responsibilities and realities of women and girls are represented and interpreted in the media. Efforts are also focused on increasing opportunities for women commentators and opinion leaders to influence public perceptions and debate. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Marriage Structure and Resistance to the Gender Revolution in the Workplace

 In this article, we examine a heretofore neglected pocket of resistance to the gender revolution in the workplace: married male employees who have stay-at-home wives. We develop and empirically test the theoretical argument suggesting that such organizational members, compared to male employees in modern marriages, are more likely to exhibit attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are harmful to women in the workplace. To assess this hypothesis, we conducted four studies with a total of 718 married, male participants. We found that employed husbands in traditional marriages, compared to those in modern marriages, tend to (a) view the presence of women in the workplace unfavorably, (b) perceive that organizations with higher numbers of female employees are operating less smoothly, (c) find organizations with female leaders as relatively unattractive, and (d) deny, more frequently, qualified female employees opportunities for promotion.

URL: 
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2018259

Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2010

New maternal mortality estimates confirm that the number of women dying in pregnancy and childbirth is declining. Along with other indicators, this joint U.N. report validates the fact that we are making progress in saving mothers’ lives, even if progress is slower than what is called for by the Millennium Development Goals.

Rapid progress in some countries demonstrates that when governments take a strategic approach to the safe motherhood challenge -- by deploying trained midwives, ensuring adequate essential supplies, making family planning accessible and providing timely obstetric care to women with complications, we are getting results. Still, there is more work to be done in delivering a world where every pregnancy is wanted and every childbirth is safe.

 

URL: 
http://www.unfpa.org/public/home/mothers/MMEstimates2012

The Girl Effect: What Do Boys Have to Do With It? Meeting Report

 The unique potential of adolescent girls to contribute to reducing and ending poverty both for themselves and their communities, often referred to as the “Girl Effect,” has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. There is a broad consensus on the desirability of involving boys and men in efforts to change harmful gender norms and create more equitable environments for girls, there is less agreement as to how this is best achieved.

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/girl-effect-what-do-boys-have-do-it-0

Single Motherhood in the United States - A Snapshot

Single motherhood is very common. Around half of today’s mothers will spend at least some time as the sole custodial parent. At any one time, almost one quarter of mothers are single mothers. Read more about single mothers in this report, including on employment, income, and poverty.

 

URL: 
http://www.legalmomentum.org/our-work/women-and-poverty/single-motherhood-in-the.html

GO ASK A GIRL: A Decade of Findings from the Girl Scout Research Institute

GO ASK A GIRL: A Decade of Findings from the Girl Scout Research Institute (PDF) summarizes the sweep of the GSRI's work over the last decade. It highlights the GSRI research and outcomes studies that have touched on timely issues relevant to girls' lives - and in many cases boys' lives - the impact of the September 11th tragedy on youth, the "obesity epidemic" and healthy living, youth leadership and civic engagement, body image and the fashion industry, girls' interactions with social media and many more. All of this is accomplished in a handy, 28 page booklet that's eye catching and accessible.

URL: 
http://www.girlscouts.org/research/pdf/go_ask_a_girl.pdf

Harvey Nash CIO Survey 2012

The number of US women in Chief Information Officer (CIO) positions has decreased since 2010, according to a survey (PDF)  released by Harvey Nash USA this week.  In 2010, 12 percent of CIOs were women.  That number dropped to 11 percent in 2011 and is down to 9 percent this year.
 
The report finds that one third of US CIOs say that within their IT organizations there are no women in management level positions.  52% of US CIOs report that women are underrepresented in their IT organizations, according to the survey.
 
(from the FMF news feed)
URL: 
http://media.harveynash.com/usa/mediacenter/2012_US_CIO_Survey.pdf

Expanding Work-Life Perspectives: Talent Management in Asia

Despite increased interest, the topic of work-life effectiveness in Asia has remained relatively under-explored in the research literature, especially in terms of how to best implement work-life practices in different cultural contexts and within specific local economies.
 
Expanding Work-Life Perspectives: Talent Management in Asia contributes to our knowledge of how organizations can best implement work-life programs in the region by focusing on the experiences of 1,834 high-potential employees working in Asia for U.S.- or European-based multinational organizations.
URL: 
http://catalyst.org/publication/530/expanding-work-life-perspectives-talent-management-in-asia
Syndicate content