Communications, Culture & Society

Popular culture and communications have a powerful influence on how gender roles are perceived and stereotypes perpetuated across society. Re:Gender and its members uncover and counter misinformation providing context and analysis about the accuracy of how the daily lives, responsibilities and realities of women and girls are represented and interpreted in the media. Efforts are also focused on increasing opportunities for women commentators and opinion leaders to influence public perceptions and debate. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Work-Life Policy Expert Heather Boushey to Speak at BPW Foundation Policy Conference

Date/Time: 
03/02/2010 - 03/03/2010

 

Pink Magazine: Where career women connect, express, learn and support one another

Throughout your life pink has been symbolic. Since the day you were born and a pink cap was placed upon your head, the color partly defined who you were and who you felt you could or could not become. At times pink was confining, girlish, degrading, liberating or all of these.

But today a growing number of women who are at, or heading for the top, are comfortable with their own pinkness-the color, the attitude, and the opportunity it represents. They are embracing their femininity along with their strength, their compassion and resilience, power and passion.
 

URL: 
http://www.pinkmagazine.com/index.html

Women as an economic opportunity

This article focuses on the banking and financial sector to demonstrate that even the most damaged sectors, in the current downturn can release significant sales and marketing value by crafting a more effective approach towards women.
 

URL: 
http://www.20-first.com/624-0-women-as-an-economic-opportunity.html

Marketing to Women Means Marketing to Men Too

This article focuses on the need for consumer goods companies to target both men and women in their advertising, not just women. By appealing to “parents and children” and not “mothers and children,” companies will gain access to a new market opportunity.
 

URL: 
http://www.20-first.com/303-0-marketing-to-women-means-marketing-to-men-too.html

Activists Who Yearn For Art That Transforms: Parallels in the Black Arts and Feminist Art Movements in the United States

Date/Time: 
04/13/2010

 

Through this offering of comparative cultural and intellectual history, Professor Collins exposes links between the Black Arts Movement and the Feminist Art Movement in the United States to address a critical question that is too often tackled without seeing these movements as central: How did postwar cultural workers deeply immersed in sociopolitical movements in the United States see their role and work?

Women's History As Personal & Political: An Event in Honor of Jane S. Gould '40

Date/Time: 
03/25/2010

 

Panel Discussion:
Location: Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall, Barnard Center for Women
 
In honor of both Women's History Month and one particular woman, Jane S. Gould '40, first permanent director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women, BCRW presents a discussion that remembers Jane and places her life and work in the context of the feminist movements that have improved our lives in so many ways.

Doing Business: Women in Africa

Report Promotes Reforms for Women’s Entrepreuneurship and focuses on women entrepreneurs from Cameroon, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, and Uganda.
 

URL: 
http://www.doingbusiness.org/documents/women_in_Africa.pdf

Girls’ Education in the 21st Century: Gender Equality, Empowerment, and Economic Growth

Much has been done to increase gender equality in education over the past 15 years. National governments and the international community have followed through on promises made in various international forums to increase investments in girls’ education. Overall female enrollment at the primary level in low-income countries has accordingly grown from 87 percent in 1990 to 94 percent in 2004, considerably shrinking the gender gap. This progress is the result of recognition of centrality of girls’ education in development and the overall progress made under the Education for All (EFA) agenda.
 

URL: 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EDUCATION/Resources/278200-1099079877269/547664-1099080014368/DID_Girls_edu.pdf

Quiet Revolutions: Postcolonial Women's Writings and Structures of Solidarity

Date/Time: 
02/16/2010

Alison Donnell

This talk offers a new reading of postcolonial women's writings. The conventional model since the 1980s has been to emphasize issues of silence and invisibility, the desire for voice and narrative space, and self-representation as a form of empowerment and transformation. What is often eclipsed as a result is a valuable political ethic based on coalition and solidarity with oppressed and marginalized figures.

The Global Gender Gap Report, 2008

Through the Global Gender Gap Reports for the past three years, the World Economic Forum has been providing a framework for quantifying the magnitute of gender-based disparities, tracking their progress over time and designing effective measures reducing them. In addition, in 2008, the Global Gender Parity Group and Regional Gender Parity Groups were launched in Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

URL: 
http://www.weforum.org/pdf/gendergap/report2008.pdf
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