Business & Entrepreneurship

Women have made significant progress in the work force and private sector, but the glass ceiling is still firmly in place, particularly at senior levels of decision-making and management. Businesses are now recognizing the importance of diversity and including a wider range of talents and perspectives at all levels of management and they are offering networking, mentoring and other services to improve recruitment and retention of women and people of color. Although women represent a significant number of small business owners, women-run businesses capture only a small percentage of capital investments and government contracts. re:gender's network is working to close these gaps by focusing attention on equal opportunity, educational parity, career options, promotions, networking and work/life balance as well as other critical issues. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Gender diversity on Boards: the Appointment process and the role of executive search firms.

The appointment of women to FTSE 350-listed non-executive director roles is being held back by selection processes which ultimately favour candidates with similar characteristics to existing male-dominated board members, according to a new report released today by the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

The report, produced by Cranfield School of Management for the Equality and Human Rights Commission, is the first in-depth study into the appointment process to corporate boards and the role of executive search firms. It follows the recent Davies Review which called upon executive search firms to take on a more active role in increasing gender diversity on FTSE boards.

URL: 
http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/uploaded_files/research/rr85_final.pdf

Valuing Good Health in Massachusetts: The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days (Executive Summary)

This report uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate the likely impact of the Massachusetts Act Establishing Earned Paid Sick Time. The study is one of a series of analyses by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) examining the costs and benefits of paid sick days policies. It estimates how much time off Massachusetts workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. It also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate how this leave policy would save money, by reducing turnover, cutting down on the spread of disease at work, helping employers avoid paying for low productivity, holding down nursing-home stays, and reducing norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (May 2012)

 

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/valuing-good-health-in-massachusetts-the-costs-and-benefits-of-paid-sick-days-executive-summary

Valuing Good Health in Massachusetts: The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days

This report uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate the likely impact of the Massachusetts Act Establishing Earned Paid Sick Time. The study is one of a series of analyses by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) examining the costs and benefits of paid sick days policies. It estimates how much time off Massachusetts workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. It also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate how this leave policy would save money, by reducing turnover, cutting down on the spread of disease at work, helping employers avoid paying for low productivity, holding down nursing-home stays, and reducing norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (May 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/valuing-good-health-in-massachusetts-the-costs-and-benefits-of-paid-sick-days-2

Paid Sick Days in Massachusetts Would Lower Health Care Costs by Reducing Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits

Thirty-six percent of working Massachusetts residents, or approximately 910,000 employees, lack access to paid sick days. This fact sheet reports findings from research by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) on how increased access to paid sick days would improve both access to health care and health outcomes in Massachusetts. The research also quantifies the savings gained by providing access to paid sick days to all workers, thereby preventing some emergency department visits in Massachusetts.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (May 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/paid-sick-days-in-massachusetts-would-lower-health-care-costs-by-reducing-unnecessary-emergency-department-visits

Giving Voice to New Jersey's Caregivers: The Union Experiences of Home-Based Child Care Providers

 A new study released by the Center for Women and Work (CWW) at the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University describes how home-based workers have fared three years after unionization and only four years after they gained the right to organize.

URL: 
http://smlr.rutgers.edu/sites/smlr/files/Giving%20Voice%20Final%20-%20for%20release%20May%2023%202012.pdf
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