Business & Entrepreneurship

Women have made significant progress in the work force and private sector, but the glass ceiling is still firmly in place, particularly at senior levels of decision-making and management. Businesses are now recognizing the importance of diversity and including a wider range of talents and perspectives at all levels of management and they are offering networking, mentoring and other services to improve recruitment and retention of women and people of color. Although women represent a significant number of small business owners, women-run businesses capture only a small percentage of capital investments and government contracts. re:gender's network is working to close these gaps by focusing attention on equal opportunity, educational parity, career options, promotions, networking and work/life balance as well as other critical issues. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Multigenerational Workforce

 


This annotated collection of recent research on multiple generations sharing the workforce captures debates among scholars including whether comparing and contrasting workplace generations yields meaningful information about people and work.

Gender & Negotiation

 


Hannah Riley Bowles is a well-known scholar in the field of negotiation and gender. She has written and presented extensively on the contextual and psychological "double bind" women experience as they negotiate for better pay in the workplace. Not without controversy, her insights into strategies women can use to counteract the biases they encounter are gaining traction in the field. The Council has compiled an annotated collection of her research below. 

 

The Challenge and the Charge: Strategies for Retaining and Advancing Women of Color

 In its recent report, Re:Gender features four exceptional women of color business leaders and explores the lessons learned by eight innovative companies that developed strategies for promoting the advancement of women of color.  The report outlines why this makes economic sense, and identifies ways diversity advocates can create more inclusive institutions that attract, support, and retain women of color in the corporate sector and beyond.

Download the report

 

 

 

Teaser: 

In its recent report, Re:Gender features four exceptional women of color business leaders and explores the lessons learned by eight innovative companies that developed strategies for promoting the advancement of women of color.

Has the time come for bolder policies for diversity at the top of the corporation?

Date/Time: 
12/10/2010

 

 December 10, 2010

8:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Venue: The Italian Academy
1161 Amsterdam Avenue (between 117th and 118th Streets), New York
(
directions and online map)

Co-hosted by:

The Athena Center for Leadership Studies at Barnard College and the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center for Leadership and Ethics

Diversity drives diversity: From the boardroom to the C-suite

EY

Incremental changes in gender diversity continued across boardrooms and C-suites at US companies in 2013.
The data reveals that these incremental changes may be transformative over time: putting women on the board and in leadership roles drives further diversification — across gender, tenure and age — in the boardroom and across the executive pipeline.

 

 

URL: 
http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-Diversity-drives-diversity/$FILE/EY-Diversity-drives-diversity.pdf

Extreme Make-Over: Corporate Board Edition

By Rosa Cho, Writer & Researcher                                                                              


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