Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints.

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Blog Posts

By Rebecca Chaleff*Last Thursday, September 22nd, I went to CUNY Graduate Center’s event, “Women in Science: Negotiating a Successful...
*By Kate MeyerLast week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal...

News

  • April 4, 2010

    Women in life sciences research still earn less than their male counterparts, with no obvious explanation for the disparity, researchers found. After accounting for professional characteristics and publication volume, female researchers earned an...


  • April 1, 2010

    For years, researchers have struggled to understand why so many women leave careers in science and engineering. Theories run the gamut, from family-unfriendly work schedules to innate differences between the genders. A new paper by McGill University...


  • March 22, 2010

    New research suggests that technically oriented women could face gender discrimination in their jobs at high-tech firms in part because of mismanaged projects.  Tech firms rely excessively on a "hero mindset" to save runaway coding...


  • March 21, 2010

    A report on the underrepresentation of women in science and math by the American Association of University Women, to be released Monday, found that although women have made gains, stereotypes and cultural biases still impede their success.


  • March 12, 2010

    Universitywide, slightly more than a quarter of Harvard faculty members are women, an all-time high, with the senior faculty accounting for most of the increase. Women also lead the engineering school, the law school, the education school, Harvard...