Economic Development & Security

Women are active players driving the economy, nationally and globally. They are important breadwinners for their families, grow most of the world’s food and are entering the formal and informal sectors of the labor market in increasing numbers. Despite their enormous contributions, women are still largely absent from leadership positions and their voices and perspectives are often missing from economic policymaking at the local, regional, national and international levels. To promote their wellbeing, women need access to adequate income and quality education to support themselves and their families. Women still earn less than men and make up a disproportionate number of the poor, both nationally and globally. In the United States, women’s wellbeing and advancement depend on their access to basic services, opportunities and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, advanced education, health care and adequate housing.

Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Re:Gender Resources

Reports & Publications

Friday, April 10, 2009 - 10:43pm

Member Organizations

Resources

Blog Posts

By Kyla Bender-BairdThe day is finally here! Today is the Economic Security Summit, Reinvesting in Women and Families: Developing an Economy for the...
Originally posted August 26, 2010 on Concern BlogsBy Allyson Brown*The Summit on the UN Millennium Development Goals is fast approaching. If we are...
Watch this video from the National Women's Law Center and join the movement for fair pay! 

News

  • May 7, 2012

    The Christian Post reports on a Penn State study that finds a correlation between the number of Wal-Mart stores and the number of hate groups in a given area, and on the reaction to the study by Concerned Women for America.


  • May 4, 2012

    HR 4160, or the State Health Flexibility Act, introduced by Congressman Todd Rokita (R-Ind) and now added to the Republican budget plan, would force states to halt programs that provide funding for abortions for low-income women.

    ...


  • May 1, 2012

    An Australian study finds that obese women are more likely to be discriminated against when applying for jobs and receive lower starting salaries than their non-overweight colleagues,

     


  • April 30, 2012

    Breast-feeding comes with an often-overlooked cost to new mothers, according to a new study by Phyllis L.F. Rippeyoung, an assistant professor at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, and published in the American Sociological Review.

     


  • April 30, 2012

    Examines the perception that women are outpacing men in the workforce.