Violence

Violence against women and girls is a global pandemic that is a human rights and public health issue as well as a major cause of death and disability. The prevalence of violence transcends boundaries of race, class, culture, social status and religion. UNIFEM estimates that six out of every ten women will experience some form of physical or sexual abuse in her lifetime. Violations can occur at home, in the workplace or in public. Of rising concern is the systematic use of rape and sexual assault as weapons of armed conflict, terror and intimidation. One of the most common forms of violence against women is intimate partner violence. There are also variations in the types of violence against women which include but are not limited to: human trafficking, dating violence, sexual assault, emotional and verbal abuse, and customary practices such as female genital mutilation and so-called “honor killings” and other forms of femicide. Re:Gender and its network members are working along with international partners to raise awareness about efforts to reduce and eliminate the scourge of violence.

Shroud of Silence

This award-winning short documentary chronicles the everyday struggle that was like for Afghan women and girls under the Taliban regime's brutal system of gender apartheid from 1994 to 2002.

Narrated by Carrie Fisher
Produced and Directed by Lorraine Sheinberg

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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 42' 51.3684" N, 74° 0' 21.5028" W

Leslye E. Orloff is vice president and director of Legal Momentum's Immigrant Women Program. She joined Legal Momentum's Washington, D.C. office in September 1999 to found and direct the Immigrant Women Program (IWP) which advocates for laws, policies and practices that enhance the legal rights of immigrant women and immigrant victims of violence against women. IWP focuses on improved access to immigration benefits, the justice system, public benefits, social services and health care.

Location

New York, NY
United States
40° 42' 51.3684" N, 74° 0' 21.5028" W

Being A Woman Is Not A Pre-Existing Condition

Watch NWLC's challenge for women to make their voices heard in the Health Care Reform debate.   

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Finding Face: A Film by Patti Duncan

 “‘Finding Face’ details the controversial case of Tat Marina, who was attacked with acid in Cambodia in 1999. At 16, Marina was a rising star in Phnom Penh’s karaoke music scene. She was coerced into an abusive relationship with Cambodia’s Undersecretary of State, Svay Sitha, and subsequently doused with a liter of nitric acid—allegedly by his wife—that disfigured her face. A decade later, despite the fact that there were multiple witnesses to the crime, no charges have ever been filed in the case.”

- Finding Face Website

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'Kembe Fen' -- Stand Firm in Solidarity with Haiti

January 25, 2010 posted by Linda Basch

Over a week has passed since the earthquake in Haiti shook the world. Our hearts go out to the people of Haiti and those who have gone to help in relief efforts. We learn with sadness about the many lives lost, including key players in the Haitian women's movement. Experts are uniting behind the idea that the most effective way to help presently is to donate money.

Many members of the National Council for Research on Women network are involved in various humanitarian efforts in Haiti. Of particular concern is the gender dimension and ensuring that women and children's specific needs are not overlooked or undervalued.

Below is news about some efforts under way in sending both relief and funds to the people of Haiti. We are concerned with efforts to address the present dire situation, but also with those directed toward rebuilding the country's infrastructure and institutions. I hope you find this useful.


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Earthquake in Haiti: Time for Seismic and Systemic Change

January 15, 2010 posted by Linda Basch

As reports filter in from Haiti in the aftermath of Wednesday's catastrophic earthquake, it is difficult to process the sheer immensity of this tragedy. My thoughts go to the tens of thousands of grieving and displaced who are struggling with unimaginable loss. I am also thinking about the hundreds, maybe thousands of colleagues, advocates and humanitarian workers who have sacrificed their lives while trying to rebuild a nation ravaged by hurricane, poverty and continuing mismanagement. The UN mission in Port au Prince is still missing more than 100 staff members and countless schools, clinics and businesses have been destroyed.

I won't go into the long and turbulent history of Haiti's past: revolt against slavery, independence, colonialism, dictatorship, fragile democracy and the US's troubling role in this tested nation's myriad challenges.


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Where Do We Stand After 30 Years of CEDAW?

December 4, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

Yesterday, three fabulous NCRW interns* and I journeyed down to the concrete maze that is the United Nations to participate in a commemorative event celebrating CEDAW’s 30th birthday. The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, often referred to as the international bill of women’s human rights, was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1979. The Convention defines discrimination as


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Newly Released! Fact Sheet on the Violence Against Women Act

December 3, 2009 posted by admin

Did you know that since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act, the National Domestic Violence Hotline has answered one million calls? Or that the Act funds more than a dozen programs and initiatives, including legal assistance to victims, education and enhanced services for victims of elder abuse, and transitional housing grant programs? Click here to download our newly released fact sheet on VAWA to learn more.


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