Special Projects

White House Research on Girls Conference and New Girls Research Portal

On April 28, Re:Gender participated in the first ever White House Research on Girls Conference. This event was a project of the White House Council on Women and Girls and was planned in collaboration with the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford, the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, Girls Inc., Lean In, Girl Scouts, Re:Gender and the Wellesley Centers for Women--founding members of the Girls Research Coalition, which was launched at the conference. Over 100 researchers, policy advocates, business leaders, members of the media and nonprofit executives participated in the conference with leading researchers presenting their work on girls and STEM, girls and leadership, and the sexualization of girls in the media. 

White House Research on Girls Conference and New Girls Research Portal

On April 28, Re:Gender participated in the first ever White House Research on Girls Conference. This event was a project of the White House Council on Women and Girls and was planned in collaboration with the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford, the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, Girls Inc., Lean In, Girl Scouts, Re:Gender and the Wellesley Centers for Women — founding members of the Girls Research Coalition, which was launched at the conference. Over 100 researchers, policy advocates, business leaders, members of the media and nonprofit executives participated in the conference with leading researchers presenting their work on girls and STEM, girls and leadership, and the sexualization of girls in the media. 

Money in Politics with a Gender Lens

Money in Politics with a Gender Lens

PDF Versions

Money in Politics with a Gender Lens

Executive Summary

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The role of money in political campaigns has grown significantly in the last 20 years and has drastically altered the landscape for campaigns, elections, and political participation. The cost of winning a congressional election has nearly doubled in 2012 dollars,[1] with the average cost of winning a U.S. House seat at $1.6 million, while a successful U.S. Senate bid averages $10.35 million. The Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (FEC) decision, which allowed for unlimited spending by outside groups on election campaigns, has led to the proliferation of groups such as “Super PACs” and a significant rise in overall campaign spending. Each election cycle offers opportunities to analyze and better understand the potential short- and long-term effects of this decision. This report focuses on one dimension of the new monetary environment: gender.

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