Primers

Precarious Lives: Gender Lens on Low-wage Work

 

 

Download Precarious Lives: Gender Lens on Low-wage Work Primer
 

Written by: Rosa Cho; Edited by: Gail Cooper
Contributors: Mimi Abramovitz, Julia R. Henly and Stephen Pimpare
 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Everything You Need to Know about the Equal Pay Act

 

 

Rosa Cho, Researcher & Writer
Abagail Kramer, Intern Researcher

 

Table of Contents

Everything You Need to Know about the Equal Pay Act

 

 

Rosa Cho, Researcher & Writer
Abagail Kramer, Intern Researcher

 

Table of Contents

Primer on Child Sexual Abuse

Developed by:
Áine Duggan, President
Gail Cooper, Vice President for Programs
Rosa Cho, Policy & Research Analyst
Sudha Rao, Programs Intern
 

Children are sexually abused more than any other demographic in the U.S. — estimates are that as many as one-in-five girls and one-in-six boys will be the victims of child sexual abuse (CSA) before they turn 18 years old. Children most often spend time with people they know and should be able to trust. At home, it is parents, siblings, extended family, babysitters and family friends; outside the home, there are day care providers, teachers, coaches, religious figures, trusted neighbors, etc. From studies of perpetrators, researchers know that “child sex offenders either seek out or take advantage of opportunities to molest children with whom they are familiar.” 

Are We Ready Yet? The ERA Today

 


Developed by: 

Linell Ajello
Rosa Cho, Policy & Research Analyst, Re:Gender
Gail Cooper, Vice President for Programs, Re:Gender
Áine Duggan, President, Re:Gender
 
 

The Equal Rights Amendment of 1972 reads: “Section 1. Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Section 2. The Congress shall be empowered to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. Section 3. This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification.”

In 2013, New York Democratic Representative Carolyn Maloney introduced to Congress a new first sentence to the amendment, which reads: “Women shall have equal rights in the United States and every place subject to its jurisdiction.”

Written by Alice Paul in 1923, the ERA was contested by labor organizations that  sought to keep protective labor laws.

Precarious Lives: Gender Lens on Low-wage Work

 

 

Download Precarious Lives: Gender Lens on Low-wage Work Primer
 

Written by: Rosa Cho; Edited by: Gail Cooper
Contributors: Mimi Abramovitz, Julia R. Henly and Stephen Pimpare
 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

No Awards to the Academy for Diversity

 
Developed by:
Linell Ajello
Áine Duggan, President
Gail Cooper, Vice President for Programs
Sudha Rao, Programs Intern

Broadcasts of the Academy Awards are second only to the Super Bowl in bringing the most Americans together to watch a televised event in real time. In 2014, 43 million viewers tuned in to the show, and 19 million related tweets went out, including Ellen DeGeneres's "selfie," the most retweeted tweet in Twitter's history. Despite the "Who will win?" fever that infects every media outlet in the first two months of the year, the outcome of the Academy Awards has never, ever been in doubt: Far more men than women will win the golden statuette and far more white people than people of color. Far. More. For example, a recent study shows that from 1927 to 2010, 226 women won the award out of the 2,357 that were conferred (not including acting or foreign film categories). In the 84-year history of the awards (the study was produced in 2011), nine women of color and 14 men of color have won in the acting categories.

What You Said About the ERA

Re:Gender has been exploring the Equal Rights Amendment and the role it does (and could or should) play in gender equality today. Should the push through out much of the 20th Century t get it passed be carried into the 21st? If so, by whom? If not, then is constitutionally sanctioned gender equality no longer relevant or necessary?

Several people have shared their POVs with us, on whether an effective ERA can positively impact the current social, policy and economic landscape where transgender women have a much higher visibility (and vulnerability), #BlackLivesMatter, the pay gap still looms large especially for Latina and African American women, immigration is unreformed, occupational segregation defeats the economic security of both women and men, etc.

In addition to those whose those who have talked and written about the legislation quite a bit, we reached out to people who don't consider themselves "experts" on the topic. Either way, we wanted to know whether the ERA could support social equity and justice movements of the moment. And if so, what does it need to look like?

We began our investigations last year by publishing a short report entitled Are We Ready Yet? The ERA Today and an op-ed in The Daily Beast.

 

A Gender Lens on Affordable Housing

 

Download A Gender Lens on Affordable Housing Primer

Developed by:
Gail Quets, Writer/Researcher
Áine Duggan, President
Gail Cooper, Vice President for Programs
 


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The report lays out a brief history of affordable housing, and uses a gender lens to look at state and federal housing policy in the public and private sectors. Attention is especially focused on looking across the gender spectrum to show groups that are disproportionately unprotected by current housing policy: women who are poor or near poor, veterans, formerly incarcerated people and gender nonconforming youth. In addition, the report offers basic definitions of housing terminology and classifications and a selection of the different types of housing available in the U.S.

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