Higher Education

Title IX at 40: Working to Ensure Gender Equity in Education

You've heard about Title IX and athletics, but Title IX is about much more! In honor of the 40th anniversary of the law’s passage, NCWGE published a comprehensive report to help give educators, parents, students, and lawmakers a better understanding of Title IX’s impact and challenges that remain in many areas of education, including:

  • Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
  • Career and Technical Education
  • Bullying and Sexual Harassment
  • Single-Sex Education
  • Pregnant and Parenting Students
  • Athletics

From the National Coalition of Women and Girls in Education

URL: 
http://www.ncwge.org/PDF/TitleIXat40.pdf

Promising Practices for Personal and Social Responsibility: Findings from a National Research Collaborative

Drawing on meetings of a distinguished group of educational researchers, this report highlights select national/multi-institutional data and major themes along five dimensions of personal and social responsibility.

By Nancy O'Neill

URL: 
http://www.aacu.org/core_commitments/documents/promising_practices_rc2012.pdf

Gender Segregation in Fields of Study at Community Colleges and Implications for Future Earnings

Postsecondary education yields myriad benefits, including increased earnings potential, higher lifetime wages, and access to quality jobs. But postsecondary degrees are not all equalin the benefits they bring to students and women tend to obtain degrees in fields with lower earnings. Women with associate degrees earn approximately 75 percent of what men with associate degrees earn (U.S. Department of Commerce and the Executive Office of the President, 2011). This wage gap occurs in part because women with AA degrees—like women at all degree levels—often work in lower-paid, female-dominated occupations (Hegewisch, et al. 2010).

by Layla Moughari, Rhiana Gunn-Wright, Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (May 2012)

 

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/gender-segregation-in-fields-of-study-at-community-colleges-and-implications-for-future-earnings

Single Student Parents Face Financial Difficulties, Debt, Without Adequate Aid

Parents with dependent children were nearly one quarter of students enrolled for credit at American postsecondary institutions in 2008. These students face significant challenges to remaining enrolled and graduating, including limited access to affordable child care, difficulty balancing the demands of school with the demands of work and family, and financial limitations that make it difficult to remain enrolled. Student parents are more likely than traditional students to say that financial difficulties are likely to result in their withdrawing from college (Miller, Gault, and Thorman 2011).

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D. (May 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/single-student-parents-face-financial-difficulties-debt-without-adequate-aid

Housing Resources and Programs for Single Student Parents at Community and Technical Colleges

Parents with dependent children now make up almost one in four students pursuing higher education in the United States (Miller, Gault and Thorman 2011). Single parents face particular challenges pursuing higher education, including securing safe and affordable housing. Single mothers often must spend over half of their income on housing expenses, leaving them with less money for educational expenses and vulnerable to housing crises that can easily derail their pursuit of a degree (Bush 2010). An analysis of effective strategies to support single student parents identifies affordable housing as one of the most important factors to ensuring student success (Women Employed 2011).

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/housing-resources-and-programs-for-single-student-parents-at-community-and-technical-colleges

Close, but No Degree

 Even in New Jersey’s highly educated workforce, with 44 percent of adults possessing at least a two‐year degree, almost a fifth of adults age 25‐64 have started college but never finished.

Inexpensive policy changes can enable the state’s agencies and colleges to improve college completion rates in the state and simultaneously meet workforce goals, according to a new report,Close, but No Degree, by the Center for Women and Work (CWW) at the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University.

URL: 
http://smlr.rutgers.edu/cww-report-close-but-no-degree

Tools for Student Parent Success: Varieties of Campus Child Care

 This toolkit is the first in a series by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). It introduces the wide variety of child care services that exist at institutions of higher learning. Rather than an exhaustive study of campus child care programs, it is an introduction to possible options. It is for those seeking to provide quality child care at colleges or universities and for those considering how to expand or rethink existing services.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/tools-for-student-parent-success-varieties-of-campus-child-care
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