Economic Security

The Impact of the New York City FY 2013 Executive Budget Proposal on Women, Children and Families

 Developed in collaboration with the Fiscal Policy Institute, the report highlights the disproportionate burden that the Executive Budget proposal places on women, children and families. NYWF hopes that this document will be instrumental in efforts to advance economic security and justice for all in New York City.

URL: 
http://www.nywf.org/pdf/NYWF_FY2013_Gender_Budget_Analysis_NYC.pdf

Women and Alzheimer's Disease: The Caregiver's Crisis

 The Working Mother Research Institute surveyed nearly 2,500 women, including more than 1,200 who have cared for a loved one with Alzheimer's, to get a clear picture of how the responsibility of caregiving affects their emotional, financial and work lives, as well as their families.

URL: 
http://www.workingmother.com/research-institute/women-and-alzheimers-disease-caregivers-crisis

Money Across Generations II: Gender Differences

Women are engaging in more regular financial conversations with their families, but men may be more willing to reach for their wallets – at least for certain types of purchases. New findings from the Money Across Generations IISM study, released today by Ameriprise Financial, demonstrate significant differences in how American men and women approach money matters, especially those concerning their adult children and parents.
 
A vast majority (93%) of baby boomers say they’ve provided financial support to their adult children, but fathers are significantly more likely than mothers to have helped fund an automobile purchase (58% vs. 48%) or co-signed a loan or lease agreement (42% vs. 32%).
URL: 
http://newsroom.ameriprise.com/images/20018/MAG%20Research%20Report%20Gender%20Differences%206-8-12.pdf

Job Growth for Women Continues in May: Both Men and Women Have Regained More Than 40 Percent of Jobs Lost

According to IWPR analysis of the June employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth continued in May with 69,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. In May women gained 95,000 jobs, but men lost 26,000.

by Institute for Women's Policy Research (June 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/job-growth-for-women-continues-in-may-both-men-and-women-have-regained-more-than-40-percent-of-jobs-lost

Valuing Good Health in Massachusetts: The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days (Executive Summary)

This report uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate the likely impact of the Massachusetts Act Establishing Earned Paid Sick Time. The study is one of a series of analyses by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) examining the costs and benefits of paid sick days policies. It estimates how much time off Massachusetts workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. It also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate how this leave policy would save money, by reducing turnover, cutting down on the spread of disease at work, helping employers avoid paying for low productivity, holding down nursing-home stays, and reducing norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (May 2012)

 

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/valuing-good-health-in-massachusetts-the-costs-and-benefits-of-paid-sick-days-executive-summary

Valuing Good Health in Massachusetts: The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days

This report uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate the likely impact of the Massachusetts Act Establishing Earned Paid Sick Time. The study is one of a series of analyses by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) examining the costs and benefits of paid sick days policies. It estimates how much time off Massachusetts workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. It also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate how this leave policy would save money, by reducing turnover, cutting down on the spread of disease at work, helping employers avoid paying for low productivity, holding down nursing-home stays, and reducing norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (May 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/valuing-good-health-in-massachusetts-the-costs-and-benefits-of-paid-sick-days-2

Paid Sick Days in Massachusetts Would Lower Health Care Costs by Reducing Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits

Thirty-six percent of working Massachusetts residents, or approximately 910,000 employees, lack access to paid sick days. This fact sheet reports findings from research by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) on how increased access to paid sick days would improve both access to health care and health outcomes in Massachusetts. The research also quantifies the savings gained by providing access to paid sick days to all workers, thereby preventing some emergency department visits in Massachusetts.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (May 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/paid-sick-days-in-massachusetts-would-lower-health-care-costs-by-reducing-unnecessary-emergency-department-visits
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