Economic Security

Allstate - National Journal Heartland Monitor XII: Gender

 The twelfth installment of the Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor polling series focused specifically on the different experiences and economic expectations of men and women in the changing economy. This survey catalogues experiences of men and women in their home, family, and professional life, and gathers perspectives on the idea of opportunity in society and the workplace in the present day and how opportunity has and will change across generations. The survey also measures Americans' opinions about the changing gender profile of the country's workforce and what factors contribute to the continuing wage gap.

March 2012

URL: 
http://www.allstate.com/heartland-monitor/gender-h12.aspx

Government That Looks Like America? Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Financial Regulatory Institutions

 Diversity in executive management is low at all agencies when compared to the percentage of people of color in the civilian labor force. Three agencies—the Federal Reserve Banks of St. Louis, Boston, and Cleveland—have no people of color in executive management.

From the Greenlining Institute

URL: 
http://greenlining.org/publications/pdf/649/649.pdf

World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development

 The 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development finds that women's lives around the world have improved dramatically, but gaps remain in many areas. The authors use a conceptual framework to examine progress to date, and then recommend policy actions.

URL: 
http://go.worldbank.org/CQCTMSFI40

Engendering agricultural research, development, and extension

 Research has shown that women, when given the capital and opportunity, make unique, positive contributions to development outcomes ranging from agricultural productivity to poverty reduction. It comes as little surprise, then, that agricultural research, development, and extension systems are generally more successful when scientists, researchers, and extension agents pay attention to gender issues. However, women continue to be underrepresented and underserved, and their contributions remain mostly untapped in national and international agricultural research. Worldwide, gender roles are culturally defined in all aspects of farming, from control of resources to production and marketing, and these definitions constrain and marginalize women. Even within the agricultural research community, most scientists and extension agents are male.

URL: 
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/engendering-agricultural-research-development-and-extension
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