Economic Security

Job Growth Continues in June: Private Sector Growing Faster than Public Sector in the Recovery

According to IWPR analysis of the June employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth continued in June with 80,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. In June women gained 32,000 jobs and men gained 48,000 jobs.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/job-growth-continues-in-june-private-sector-growing-faster-than-public-sector-in-the-recovery

Financial Experience & Behaviors Among Women: 2012-2013 Prudential Research Study

Prudential's 2012-2013 Research Study, "Financial Experience & Behaviors Among Women," reveals that while women are more in control of their finances than ever, they are facing significant challenges with financial decision making.

URL: 
http://www.prudential.com/media/managed/wm/WM-Women_are_Taking_on_Greater_Financial_Challenges.html

Third Anniversary of the Recovery Shows Job Growth for Women Slowed by Public Sector Job Losses

The deep recession that began in December 2007 and cost nearly 7.5 million jobs was harder on male workers, but the recovery that officially began in June 2009 has been slower for women. After losing ground at the start of the recovery, the pace of the recovery has picked up for women. Three years into the recovery (June 2009 to June 2012), women have gained back 24 percent of the jobs they lost during the recession; men have gained back 39 percent. However, heavy public sector job losses continue to hinder the recovery for both women and men, but especially for women: for every 10 private sector jobs women gained in the first three years of the recovery, they lost more than 4 public sector jobs.

 

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/resource/third-anniversary-recovery-shows-job-growth-women-slowed-public-sector-job-losses

Oceans Apart: The Higher Health Costs of Women in the U.S. Compared to Other Nations, and How Reform Is Helping

An estimated 18.7 million U.S. women ages 19 to 64 were uninsured in 2010, up from 12.8 million in 2000. An additional 16.7 million women had health insurance but had such high out-of-pocket costs relative to their income that they were effectively underinsured in 2010. This issue brief examines the implications of poor coverage for women in the United States by comparing their experiences to those of women in 10 other industrialized nations, all of which have universal health insurance systems. The analysis finds that women in the United States—both with and without health insurance— are more likely to go without needed health care because of cost and have greater difficulty paying their medical bills than women in the 10 other countries. In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will substantially reduce health care cost exposure for all U.S. women by significantly expanding and improving health insurance coverage.

URL: 
http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Publications/Issue-Briefs/2012/Jul/Oceans-Apart-Women.aspx
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