Communications, Culture & Society

Popular culture and communications have a powerful influence on how gender roles are perceived and stereotypes perpetuated across society. Re:Gender and its members uncover and counter misinformation providing context and analysis about the accuracy of how the daily lives, responsibilities and realities of women and girls are represented and interpreted in the media. Efforts are also focused on increasing opportunities for women commentators and opinion leaders to influence public perceptions and debate. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

WOMEN GO GLOBAL CD-ROM

The United Nations and the International Women's Movement 1945-2000

To mark Beijing +5, the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women have produced Women Go Global, showing how the international women's movement and the United Nations have worked side-by-side in the quest for gender equality. The multimedia presentation features milestones in the establishment of the international agenda for equality between women and men, from the creation of the United Nations in 1945 and Beijing +5 in June 2000. Kristen Timothy, Visiting Scholar at the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, undertook the substantive research that provides the basis for the program.

To order a copy of Women Go Global, click here.

 

 

Teaser: 

The United Nations and the International Women's Movement 1945-2000 To mark Beijing +5, the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women will produce a CD-Rom showing how the international women's movement and the United Nations have worked side-by-side in the quest for gender equality. Milestones in the establishment of the international agenda for equality between women and men from the creation of the United Nations in 1945 and Beijing +5 in June 2000 are featured in the multi-media presentation.

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THE GIRLS REPORT: What We Know & Need to Know About Growing Up Female

"Seven years ago the National Council for Research on Women and its member centers issued major reports on the status of girls in society, in schools, and in youth organizations in the United States. Since then, university researchers and popular writers have focussed attention on girls. The Girls Report is a fresh and timely look at every aspect of life for girls as we look toward the new millenium.

"If the reports in the early 1990s struck a chord of concern and a call to action, the tone of this report is optimism and activism. As we say at Girls Incorporated, girls are strong, smart and bold unless society puts barriers in their way. Lynn Phillips and the National Council staff have captured the strength, the energy, and the possibilities of girls on their way to becoming young women, while calling on the rest of us to be vigilant in supporting girls' high hopes and expectations for their own achievement."

Teaser: 

The Girls Report surveys current studies on girls, mapping theoretical debates, countering popular myths with recent research findings, and highlighting successful programs serving diverse populations. Chapters on education, health, self-esteem, violence, sexuality, and economic realities conclude with clear recommendations for action. A comprehensive bibliography offers resources to educators, researchers, policymakers, and all concerned with increasing opportunities for girls.

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Media and Popular Culture: A Catch-22

May 21, 2009 posted by admin

Mass media is the heart of many current debates; however, the nature of the media remains double-edged. On a positive side, blogging and other forms of on-line communication have become key aspects of today’s feminist outreach. On line gender related activism and strive for change challenge and supplement the mainstream media. For example, check out this post from Racialicious (fyi, the editor of this fantastic blog is one of our panelists):


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Keeping Women on the Economic Agenda

Last night I attended a dynamic panel hosted by Legal Momentum on Women’s Economic Equality: The Next Frontier in Women’s Rights.  The brilliant panelists duked it out, discussing the current economic situation, its impact on women, and in what directions we should be heading. 


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Gains and Gaps: A Look at the World's Women

GAINS AND GAPS: A LOOK AT THE WORLD'S WOMEN

(March 2006) Over the past decade, United Nations agencies have tracked women’s progress in critical areas identified by the 1995 United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing . In 2000, the Re:Gender, formerly National Council for Research on Women, produced a report which, through statistics, mirrored these areas and provided a snapshot of the current status of women in the world. In Spring 2006, the organization released a report that presents another snapshot, five years later – Gains and Gaps: A Look at the World's Women.

We express profound gratitude to the institutions that provided funding for this report.

We especially thank the Lead Sponsor, UBS, for its encouragement and generous financial support from the early stages of the project through its completion.

Teaser: 

Over the past decade, United Nations agencies have tracked women’s progress in critical areas identified by the 1995 United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing . In 2000, Re:Gender, formerly National Council for Research on Women, produced a report which, through statistics, mirrored these areas and provided a snapshot of the current status of women in the world. In Spring 2006, we released a report that presents another snapshot, five years later – Gains and Gaps: A Look at the World's Women.

Cover Image: 

Keeping Women on the Economic Agenda

April 3, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird Last night I attended a dynamic panel hosted by Legal Momentum on Women’s Economic Equality: The Next Frontier in Women’s Rights.  The brilliant panelists duked it out, discussing the current economic situation, its impact on women, and in what directions we should be heading.  Legal Momentum President, Irasema Garza, discussed the frustration that while historic legal victories were secured decades ago, this hasn’t translated into systematic equality for the majority of women in the U.S.  Women continue to be steered away from training opportunities, segregated into low-wage jobs, and are 42% more likely to be poor than men. In the midst of this stalemate came a ray of sunshine: the election of Obama.  With this historic election comes the opportunity to set new goals, reframe old debates, and shift the focus of our advocacy.  In this light, Legal Momentum is calling for a Second Bill of Rights for Women.  The bill must provide pathways to employment for women through job training and education; secure rights and supports to ensure women earn a living wage; ensure that public benefits provide an adequate safety net; and expand legal rights and support services for survivors of domestic violence. Heather Boushey brought her economic expertise from the Center for American Progress and laid out the current stark reality:


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New Film—Not Yet Rain—Tells the Stories of Women Who Have Sought Abortion Care

March 11, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird Yesterday, the fantastic international reproductive rights organization, IPAS contacted the Council, announcing the launch of an important new film: Not Yet Rain.  Here’s the scoop:


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GIRLS FORUM: Round-Up

February 13, 2009 posted by Linda Basch Last week we reached out to advocates and scholars working on issues affecting girls’ lives to submit their Girls Agenda 2009: More funding for teen dating violence prevention? More attention paid to the international trafficking of girls? New programs to promote the health, safety, and well-being of future women?  Effective, comprehensive sex education in our schools? The responses we received were dynamic, fresh, and exciting.  Deborah Tolman, Professor of Social Welfare, Hunter College School of Social Work, suggested that in order to enhance girls’ resiliency, we must do more than reduce risk—we must provide encouragement so that they may live their lives in the positive.  Lyn Mikel Brown, author of Girlfighting, offered an insightful critique of the “mean girl” phenomenon and recommended a strength-based approach: “We affirm girls’ relational and political strengths by giving them reason to believe they can count on one another and work together to solve social problems.”  Allison Kimmich, Executive Director of the National Women’s Study Association, drew on Obama’s role as both father and policymaker, nudging him to make policy decisions in the same manner he parents.


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