Communications, Culture & Society

Popular culture and communications have a powerful influence on how gender roles are perceived and stereotypes perpetuated across society. Re:Gender and its members uncover and counter misinformation providing context and analysis about the accuracy of how the daily lives, responsibilities and realities of women and girls are represented and interpreted in the media. Efforts are also focused on increasing opportunities for women commentators and opinion leaders to influence public perceptions and debate. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

How Academic Biologists and Physicists View Science Outreach

 Scholars and pundits alike argue that U.S. scientists could do more to reach out to the general public. Yet, to date, there have been few systematic studies that examine how scientists understand the barriers that impede such outreach. Through analysis of 97 semi-structured interviews with academic biologists and physicists at top research universities in the United States, we classify the type and target audiences of scientists’ outreach activities. Finally, we explore the narratives academic scientists have about outreach and its reception in the academy, in particular what they perceive as impediments to these activities. We find that scientists’ outreach activities are stratified by gender and that university and disciplinary rewards as well as scientists’ perceptions of their own skills have an impact on science outreach. Research contributions and recommendations for university policy follow.

URL: 
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0036240

State of the World's Mothers 2012: Nutrition in the First 1,000 Days

Save the Children’s State of The World's Mothers Report Ranks Niger as the Worst Country in the World to be a Mother

The report shows how low cost solutions like breastfeeding and basic hygiene can save more than 1 million children’s lives each year. Read the report, watch the videos and share info graphics. Then sign our petition to urge World Leaders to support child survival solutions.

URL: 
www.savethechildren.org/world-mothers

Pay Matters: The Positive Economic Impacts of Paid Family Leave for Families, Businesses and the Public

With a growing need for family-friendly workplace policies, a new study commissioned by the National Partnership for Women & Families, with support from the Rockefeller Foundation, concludes that providing paid family leave to workers leads to positive economic outcomes for working families, businesses and the public.
 
The research, conducted by the Center for Women and Work at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, finds that women who use paid leave are far more likely to be working nine to 12 months after a child’s birth than those who do not take any leave.
URL: 
http://smlr.rutgers.edu/paymatters-cwwreport-january2012
Syndicate content